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Hunting, fishing issues top meeting agenda PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 30 March 2011 16:47

Use of dogs in bear season, management of bass among topics to be discussed at WCC session April 11 in Cedarburg

Ozaukee County residents will have the chance to express their views on a variety of natural-resources issues during an annual spring meeting of the Wisconsin Conservation Congress on Monday, April 11.

The 7 p.m. event will be at Webster Transitional School, W75 N624 Wauwatosa Rd., Cedarburg.

Similar Conservation Congress meetings are held throughout the state in conjunction with the Department of Natural Resources’ spring hearings.

This year, the Congress is seeking public input on 38 advisory questions. Among the proposals to be discussed are the following:

•  To allow bear hunting with dogs statewide.

•  To allow the use of rifles for deer hunting statewide.

•  To legalize crossbows during the archery season.

•  To change the definition  of a vehicle used to transport weapons.

•  To modify the open-water rule for disabled hunters.

•  To exempt all buildings from the 100-yard firearm discharge prohibition for hunters using public lands.

•  To manage largemouth and smallmouth bass as separate species.

•  Suggestions to enhance fishing opportunities on lakes and rivers. 

“Citizens have the opportunity to weigh  in on natural-resources issues that may affect them,” said David Grisar, chairman of the Conservation Congress’ Ozaukee County delegation.

“The Congress asks these questions to gauge the public’s support, or lack thereof, on any given issue.”

Residents’ input on the advisory questions will be presented to the Natural Resources Board in May. If there is significant support for a proposal, the question could become a DNR rule change proposal.

“Conservation Congress advisory questions generally originate from citizens’ ideas,” said Ed Harvey, Congress chairman.

“If resolutions presented at the county-level meetings are supported, the resolution is advanced to one of the Congress’ study committees and the Congress Executive Council for consideration.”

Each year more than 200 resolutions are introduced at local levels, Harvey said.

“Not all pass, but the ones that do begin their journey to become a rule, policy or legislative change in the subsequent years,” he said.

“It is a true grassroots process that empowers the citizens of this state to shape natural-resources policy.”

Residents who present resolutions must submit two copies typed or neatly printed on 8-1/2-by-11-inch white paper.

In addition to discussing advisory questions, the county meeting is held to elect Conservation Congress delegates. To vote for delegates or serve as one, residents must be 18 years old and provide identification and proof of county residency.

There are two delegate seats up for election in Ozaukee County this year. Delegates serve two or three-year terms and must be willing to volunteer their time and represent local residents on natural-resources issues.

For  more information, call Grisar at 268-1461.

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