Share this page on facebook
Port Washington


PW-S district earns national AP recognition PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by BILL SCHANEN IV   
Wednesday, 14 November 2012 18:56

Award cites PWHS program that helps growing number of  students earn college credits

    The Port Washington-Saukville School District has received national recognition for an advanced placement program that is giving more students than ever a chance to earn college credits in high school.

    The district is one of 539 school systems in the United States and Canada named to the AP District Honor Roll, the College Board, which administers the advanced placement system, announced Monday.

    That puts Port Washington High School’s advanced placement program in the top echelon of AP programs in the nation. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, there are 16,025 public school districts in the United States alone.

    Twenty-five other districts in Wisconsin were named to the honor roll. The Cedarburg School District is the only other one in Ozaukee County on the list.

    “Success isn’t accidental,” Port Washington High School Principal Eric Burke told the School Board Monday. “We’re very proud of this honor, and it goes back to the teachers, students and parents in this district.”

    The recognition is based on two factors — increasing student access to advanced placement courses and the percentage of students who earn a score of 3 or higher on AP exams.

    The AP program prepares students for post-high school education with college-level courses and allows them to earn credits credit at most colleges by scoring at least 3 out of 5 points on AP exams.

    It is not uncommon, administrators said, to have at least one Port High student graduate with sophomore standing in college because of AP coursework.

    The AP Honor Roll recognition is based on the last three years of districts’ advanced placement testing. During that time, the number of Port High students who took AP exams increased from 226 to 295.

    The percentage of students who scored 3 or higher on the exams has increased from 78% in 2010 to 85% in 2012. The school’s mean exam score is 3.3.

    The school offers AP courses in 14 subject areas.

    Port High is being recognized for striking a balance between student participation in the AP program and test scores, which is not the case in all school districts, administrators said. Some high schools, mindful that AP test scores are one of the measures by which schools are compared, only encourage their highest achieving students to take AP exams.

    “Could our test scores be higher if we didn’t encourage all students to participate in AP classes? Probably,” Burke said.

    “But we want all of students to have the opportunity to prepare themselves for college and earn college credits at Port High.”

    Burke credited teachers and counselors with encouraging students to take AP courses and exams.

    Chris Surfus, the district’s curriculum coordinator, said Port High’s AP program is also successful because the district provides funding to train AP instructors, which is not the norm.

    “This is a pretty remarkable honor for our program,” Supt. Michael Weber said.

    “One of the truest measures of whether you’re connecting the curriculum with students are advanced placement scores and, of course, the end result is having your students go to college with credits.”


 
WWII monument dedication by invite only PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 07 November 2012 19:41

Decision to limit crowd at park event Friday catches some Port officials off guard

    The Stars and Stripes Honor Flight will dedicate its World War II monument on Port Washington’s coal dock Friday afternoon in a ceremony that will give about 150 people their first look at the coal dock property — but not the general public.

    The news that the 3 p.m. ceremony to dedicate the memorial, a replica of the Wisconsin Pillar at the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C., is by invitation only surprised some city officials.

    “I thought it was open to anybody,” Ald. Paul Neumyer said. “I’m at a loss. It’s city controlled property. I always thought public property was open to everybody.”

    Joe Dean, a city alderman and chairman of the Stars and Stripes Honor Flight board, said the group decided to make the dedication an invitation-only event because of the vagaries of the weather.

    “The weather is unpredictable and we have a tent that seats 150 people,” Dean said. “This is not meant to be controversial.”

    Invitations went out to key veterans and volunteers who have given years of service to the Honor Flight and its efforts to take World War II veterans to Washington, D.C., to visit the memorial dedicated to them, he said.

    Members of the Port Washington-Saukville Rotary Club also received invitations.

    “We wanted to be sure they have a place,” Dean said. “We’re trying to do something nice for our vets, period. I think the vast number of people understand that.”

    If other people show up for the ceremony, they won’t be turned away, he said, adding organizers request a reservation through the Stars and Stripes website.

    The grand opening of the coal dock planned for June will be for the community, Dean added.

    “Everyone will be welcome to view it when we have the open house,” he said.

    Ald. Jim Vollmar said he, too, was surprised to learn the dedication is by invitation only.

    “Most dedications should be open to the public,” he said. “The question to me is whether the coal dock is ready to be open.”

    With construction crews continuing to work on infrastructure for the coal dock park, Vollmar said, there may be safety issues.

    Port Washington Mayor Tom Mlada concurred, saying the constraints of construction would make it difficult for large numbers of people to get to the memorial.

    “I think it’s the reality of logistics,” he said. “I see a sense of urgency with the timing of the event, given the age of the veterans.

    “I think we’ve got to get construction done and get through the challenges of the weather, and in June we’re going to have a very large grand opening event.”

    Friday’s event will include performances by the Thomas Jefferson Middle School choir and vocalist Jenny Thiel, a presentation of colors by the Veterans of Foreign Wars, remarks by a variety of dignitaries and the reading of a eulogy for a World War II soldier by Abby Cibulka, an eighth-grader at John Long Middle School in Grafton.

    Veterans Harvey Kurz and Joe Demler will place a wreath at the site.


Image Information: SMOOTHING CONCRETE along the promenade at the north end of the coal dock early this week was Jesse Keller of Cascade.    Photo by Sam Arendt



 
Despite aid cut, school budget comes close to flat tax levy PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by BILL SCHANEN IV   
Wednesday, 31 October 2012 18:12

PW-S spending plan for 2012-13 includes funding for energy-cost saving initiative

    The Port Washington-Saukville School Board on Monday approved a revised 1012-13 budget that, despite being thrown a last-minute curve by a decrease in state aid, comes close to the district’s goal of a flat tax levy.

    The spending plan, which includes funding for a roughly $2 million energy efficiency capital improvement initiative, results in a $14.2 million property tax levy — a .35% increase of $49,378 — that was also approved by the board.

    The resulting tax rate of $9.71 per $1,000 of property value is a 34-cent (3.6%) increase from last school year, one that is due in part to an average 3.2% decrease in equalized property values in the school district.

    On average, the owner of a $175,000 property would pay an additional $5.74 in school taxes, but how the rate affects taxpayers depends on how much property values decreased in their city, town or village.

    While all five taxing entities in the school district lost property value, some lost more than others. Residents of communities that suffered the largest decreases in value are expected to see their school taxes decrease, while those who live in areas that had less of a decrease should see a tax hike.

    For instance, equalized property values in the City of Port Washington decreased by about the average, so the owner of a $175,000 property can expect to pay $6.11 more in school taxes this year, according to school district figures.

    The Village of Saukville had the smallest property value decrease, so village residents who live in the Port Washington-Saukville School District can expect to see the largest increase on their tax bills — $22.47 for a $175,000 property, according to district calculations.

    Portions of the towns of Grafton, Saukville and Port Washington all experienced larger than average decreases in property value, which means school tax bills will decrease slightly in these areas.

    In June, the School Board approved a budget that school officials thought anticipated key variables such as state aid and changes in property values. But last month, administrators were surprised by state aid calculations that showed the district, like the majority of school systems in Wisconsin, will receive less funding this year.

    “We thought there could be a slight adjustment, but a decrease of this amount was definitely not anticipated,” Supt. Michael Weber said. “The loss of $180,000 is not as significant as what some other districts experienced, but it’s still quite significant.

    “And we still do not have a sound explanation for why two-thirds of the districts in the state are receiving less aid.”

    The decrease in state aid continues a recent trend in which local property taxes, as opposed to state aid, fund a greater share of education costs in the district. Until last school year, it was the state that bore that burden. This school year, local property taxes constitute 48% of the district operating revenue while state sources account for 44.7%. A number of other smaller funding sources make up the difference.

    The loss of state aid could have been a larger problem had the school district financial outlook not been so positive.

    For the first time in many years, the district began this year’s budget process without a proposed deficit. In addition, it retired its referendum debt last school year, taking the burden of a $473,429 annual payment off the tax levy.

    The district also ended last school year with a budget surplus of $795,000, which was invested in fund equity. Fund equity is essentially the district’s savings account.

    That set the stage for what administrators said was a unique opportunity — a capital improvement initiative designed to improve energy efficiency in buildings throughout the district.

    Normally, school districts must win voter approval in a referendum to borrow more than $1 million, but the Port Washington-Saukville School Board used an exemption that allows boards to authorize borrowing in excess of $1 million for projects that improve energy efficiency.

    The board on Monday approved a resolution that allows the district to increase its revenue limit to pay for the projects. It has authorized the borrowing of no more than $2.27 million.

    To soften the impact of the debt on the levy, the board decided to apply $400,000 — half of last year’s budget surplus — from fund equity to the project.

    This year’s payment on the 10-year loan is expected to be less than $200,000, which administrators point out is less than half of what the annual payment on the referendum debt was.

    The energy-efficiency projects include replacing existing lighting with LED fixtures and bulbs, weatherizing buildings, installing water conservation devices and vending machine energy controls, upgrading air-handling controls and recommissioning ventilation systems throughout the district. The project also includes the replacement of heating systems at Dunwiddie and Saukville elementary schools.

    The district’s performance contractor, McKinstry, estimates a $214,000 savings in energy and operational costs and potential incentives worth $41,548, for about a 10-year payback on the project.

    “We’re very pleased that this budget allowed us a unique opportunity to address energy efficiency in our buildings,” Weber said. “The whole dynamic of the events surrounding this budget were very unusual, but we were able to take advantage of them to benefit our district.”


   

 
Community garden may become home to bees PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 24 October 2012 19:24

Organizers of Hales Trail site consider adding hive to help pollinate crops, give apiarists hands-on training

    A proposal to place a beehive at the Hales Trail Community Garden in Port Washington is being considered by organizers.

    Bethel Metz said the possibility is one she has been discussing with Derek Strohl, who led the campaign to create the garden.

    “It’s natural. One goes hand-in-hand with the other,” she said. “You can’t have a garden or produce without bees, and you can’t have bees without food.”

    Many community gardens throughout the country are homes to beehives, and they are operated without problems, Metz said.

    “We have a lot of people interested in how this works,” she said. “Our community now is very aware of urban beekeeping, and this is one way of continuing that conversation.”

    Metz, who said the proposal is only in the discussion stages, said she and her husband wouldn’t relocate the hive at their house but instead place a new one at the garden.

    She and her husband would care for the hive, Metz said, adding that if other people are interested in caring for bees, the hive could be used for hands-on training.

    “There are people who want to learn a lot more about it,” she said.

    Strohl said he has discussed the concept with a number of gardeners at the community garden, and they were supportive of the idea.

    Allowing bees would be mutually beneficial, he said, noting the insects would help pollinate the crops grown there.

    However, Strohl said, the bees wouldn’t spend all their time in the garden, noting they travel miles to obtain nectar.

    “People wholeheartedly support having the bees as long as we inform the gardeners,” Strohl said, adding the garden’s license with the city would have to be amended to allow the hive. “We all know having the bees would be a great service for the gardens.”

    The garden would also need to get approval from neighboring property owners before a hive could be placed there, he said.

    Strohl said he expects to review the concept with the Port Parks and Recreation Board in the coming months to see if it is possible.

    “We’re in the early stages of this,” Metz said. “By no means is this something we expect to happen.”

    Strohl said the garden exceeded all expectations in its inaugural year.

    “I’m thrilled. It was just lush,” he said. “I’m amazed at the quality and quantity of produce that came out of that soil. We didn’t put anything into it.”

    Some gardeners are amending the soil now, using manure brought to the site this summer by an area farmer, he said. Gardeners have until Dec. 31 to reserve their plots for next year.

    “I anticipate we’ll have a pretty high renewal rate,” he said. “It was such a good feeling to see the community garden work, to see gardeners share their knowledge with each other and come together.”


 
Residents pitch ideas for coal dock park PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 17 October 2012 18:21

Proposals for lakefront land offered at meeting include kite festival, ski area, planetarium, museum and more

    Ideas as disparate as a kite festival, cross-county ski area, a planetarium and a shipwreck museum were suggested for Port Washington’s coal dock during a public information meeting Tuesday.

    About a dozen people attended the meeting to hear about infrastructure that is being constructed on the dock and to propose ideas for uses of the park.

    “We’re looking for ideas, either for specific events or permanent improvements,” Public Works Director Rob Vanden Noven said, noting that many of the uses included in a 2009 master plan are concepts.

    Port Washington Tourism Director Kathy Tank, a member of the Coal Dock Committee, cited a proposed community center on the coal dock.

    “At the time, we envisioned the historical society museum to be out there,” she said. “Now, they have a home in downtown. We need to look at that.”

    Dan Micha suggested the city create a planetarium on the dock, noting there is no such structure nearby.

    “I’m thinking about a draw,” he said. “We can enjoy this as a community year-round. There’s no reason a 9 or 10-year-old can’t go there and get excited and learn.”

    The city should approach We Energies’ foundation to seek funding for the proposed community center on the dock, Micha added.

    “Approach them, get the check and get it done,” he said.

    John Sigwart asked whether the city had considered building a structure that could create revenue for the community, particularly on that portion of the dock that isn’t governed by the state’s public trust doctrine. That document requires the dock, most of which is filled lakebed, to be used for public purposes, not private ones.

    That’s unlikely since the city is leasing the dock from We Energies, said Vanden Noven, noting that the utility is not interested in allowing the city to do that.

    One man asked how realistic it is to think the city could become headquarters for a proposed shipwreck sanctuary by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration with a flagship building on the coal dock.

    When the sanctuary was proposed in 2010, NOAA officials stressed that its creation would take a long time and was in the early stages.

    Today, creation of the sanctuary is stalled at the federal level, Tank said.

    “If they ever move it off center, we’re in the running,” she said. “Stalled doesn’t mean dead.”

    But with federal budget struggles looming, the immediate prospects aren’t good, she said.

    Bill Moran suggested the city consider holding a kite festival on the dock, noting the lack of power lines and the lake winds would make it an ideal location.

    “I want to go out there and fly a kite with my granddaughter,” he said.    

    Several people spoke to the need to have portable toilets available on the dock, at least until the proposed community building is constructed.

    The coal dock park, which was approved in concept in an agreement between We Energies and the city in 2001, is envisioned as a four-season park that will both the community and attract regional visitors.

    The south dock, which will be connected to the north dock by a pedestrian bridge, is home to a bird sanctuary and a pedestrian pathway that leads to the south beach.

    But the 17-acre north dock holds infinite promise for the city, Vanden Noven said.

    The city is currently building a 1,000-foot-long promenade along the north side of the dock, an entry drive, parking, east-side boardwalk and docking spaces for tall ships and other large vessels.

    The former crane rail, which runs near the promenade, will be overlaid with concrete to create a bench. Wooden benches will also be installed every 100 feet.

    A World War II memorial has already been approved for the site. It will be built on the southeast corner of the dock.

    At Tuesday’s Common Council meeting, Ald. Jim Vollmar said the city should reconsider its decision not to install a railing along the promenade, saying there needs to be a barrier to keep people from falling into the lake.

    “That whole area is going to be open,” Vollmar said, adding that ladders the city installed to help anyone who falls get back onto land aren’t adequate.

    Vanden Noven, who noted that the Coal Dock Committee had not expressed any concerns about the lack of fencing, said it’s common not to have a railing in areas where large ships moor because it gives maximum flexibility in docking these boats.

    The promenade is 18-1/2-feet wide, giving people plenty of room to walk, he added.

    “In summertime, we have hundreds of people navigating the breakwater, which is much narrower, without falling in,” Vanden Noven said. “It hasn’t been an issue.”

    The issue will be placed on the next Coal Dock Committee agenda for discussion, he added.

    Mayor Tom Mlada said he expects Tuesday’s public informational meeting will be the first in a series of community forums on the coal dock, noting the community needs to help determine the uses for what will be a showpiece park for the city.
   
“I certainly don’t view that one meeting as the be all and end all,” Mlada said. “My hope is we get people to understand they can still play a role in determining what we need that coal dock to be.”

 
<< Start < Prev 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Next > End >>

Page 19 of 52
advertisement
Banner
Banner
404 - Fehler: 404
404 - Kategorie nicht gefunden

Die Seite kann nicht angezeigt werden, weil:

  1. Ein veraltetes Lesezeichen
  2. Eine Suchmaschine hat einen veralteten Index der Website
  3. Eine falsche Adresse
  4. Kein Zugriff auf diese Seite!
  5. Die angefragte Quelle wurde nicht gefunden!
  6. Während der Anfrage ist ein Fehler aufgetreten!

Bitte eine der folgenden Seiten ausprobieren:

Bei Problemen ist der Administrator dieser Website zuständig..

Kategorie nicht gefunden