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Nine-month-old boy bitten by dog Tuesday at park PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 14 July 2010 18:11
A nine-month-old boy playing in Upper Lake Park was bitten in the face Tuesday night by a dog whose owner walked away after the incident, according to Port Washington police.

Young Henry Johnson is doing well, but his parents are frustrated by the incident.

“It really kind of angers me that he (the dog’s owner) wouldn’t stick around,” Henry’s father Keith said Wednesday. “You need to take some responsibility.”

Henry was treated at an urgent care center for a bite on his upper lip and marks on his nose and chin, his father said.

“His lip’s a little bruised, but he’s fine,” he said, noting the bite required medical glue but not stitches. “It’s just a little cut.”

Johnson said his wife Rebecca and Henry were in the park when a man walking two dogs — one on a leash and the other off leash — came up to them about 8 p.m. and began talking to his wife.

Mrs. Johnson told police that when the dog on the leash got within reach of her son, she told the man to watch the dog because Henry, who was crawling in the grass, likes to grab things, according to the police report.

The dog then bit Henry in the face, according to the report. As Mrs. Johnson picked her son up, she noticed the man was leaving the area. She called to him, telling him the dog bit her son, but he continued to walk away, police said.

She then caught up to the man, told him what had happened and showed him the blood on her son’s face, according to the report.

The man scolded the dog, then got into his car and drove off, police said.

Mrs. Johnson got the license plate number, which police traced to the 84-year-old  Port Washington man, the report states.

“If my wife wouldn’t have had the sense to take down his license plate, we wouldn’t know if the dog might have had rabies or anything,” Mr. Johnson said.

When police spoke to the man, he told police he did not see any blood on the child’s face or other serious injury and didn’t think too much of the incident, according to the report.

The man, who admitted his other dog was running free at the time, was told he would receive a citation for having an unleashed dog, police said.

An investigation into the incident is continuing, police said.
 
Voters will decide how to choose town clerk PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 07 July 2010 18:36

Port Town Board agrees to hold November referendum to determine if office should be appointed instead of elected

Town of Port Washington residents will be asked this fall whether the town clerk should be appointed in the future.

The Town Board on Tuesday reviewed a proposed ordinance calling for the clerk’s position to become appointed — a move that is becoming more common in townships.

A public hearing on the proposal will be held during the Tuesday, Sept. 7, Town Board meeting.

The matter will then be put to a referendum vote in November. If approved, it will take effect next spring, when Clerk Jennifer Schlenvogt’s term expires.

Town Chairman Lee Schlenvogt said supervisors want to give residents plenty of time to weigh in on the proposal.

“We want to know how our residents feel about this,” Schlenvogt said, adding the board deliberately decided to hold the referendum during the November election.

“We wanted a well-attended election so we know how our people feel about this,” he said.

Schlenvogt said the board decided to look into appointing its clerk after longtime Clerk Susan Westerbeke resigned in mid-term this spring.

“Our hands were really tied on filling the position,” he said.

The board had to appoint someone who was a town resident, and couldn’t alter the pay to reflect the person’s experience.

Finding a qualified person in a township of less than 1,700 people was a challenge, Schlenvogt said.

“A large number of those people have absolutely no interest in town government,” and many are not qualified for the clerk’s job, he said.

Five people applied to complete Westerbeke’s term, which ends in April, but three of those applicants lived outside the town, Schlenvogt said.

Fortunately, the two remaining applicants were qualified, he added.

Jennifer Schlenvogt, who had been the town’s chief election inspector for the past two years and a poll worker for five years, was unanimously appointed to fill the remaining year on Westerbeke’s term.

“We were very fortunate. It worked out,” Lee Schlenvogt said. “If those two applicants hadn’t come forth, the town could have been left in the lurch. I don’t know what we would have done.

“The clerk’s position is integral to town government.”

Not only does the clerk handle a number of administrative duties, he or she is also in charge of elections.

Appointing a clerk will give the Town Board a larger pool of potential people to choose from and help ensure the person hired can readily step in when the current clerk steps down, Schlenvogt noted.

“A number of the town chairman I spoke to said this was the best move they ever made,” he said.

Although many townships have also decided to appoint their treasurers, Schlenvogt said the Town of Port hasn’t discussed that possibility.

“We often have people approach us about combining the clerk and treasurer’s position,” he said. “But we like the check and balance that having a separate clerk and treasurer provides.”

The proposed ordinance reviewed Tuesday calls for the clerk’s position to be filled by appointment of the Town Board, with the clerk serving a three-year term. The clerk could be removed during the term for cause.

 
City rejects repair plan for former bank PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 30 June 2010 17:13

Commission says firm’s proposal to use alternative materials would damage building rather than restore it

The Port Washington Plan Commission last week rejected a proposal by Port Harbor Investments to use different materials than those previously approved to repair the former M&I Bank building on Franklin Street in downtown Port.

Commission members said the materials proposed by the firm would not match the facade of the existing building and would cause additional damage to the structure.

“This process is actually harmful to the building,” commission member Bud Sova said. “The materials don’t match the masonry, and they are not materials conducive to that application in a historic building.”

The city has been trying to get the firm to repair the former bank for several years, since early renovation attempts left the building in shambles.

The city repeatedly tried to get the owners to fix the building. Last fall, officials called it an eyesore and safety hazard and filed a lawsuit hoping to force the firm to repair the structure.

The investment firm recently signed a stipulation agreeing to, among other things, fix the building facade with materials approved by the Plan Commission by July 16.

Randy Tetzlaff, the city’s director of planning and development, said the firm wanted to use injected molded polymer brick panels on the parapet wall instead of the reinforced fiberglass resin originally approved for the work.

“They’re looking for a short-term, less-expensive solution,” Tetzlaff said, noting the firm’s ultimate goal is to raze the building.

Tetzlaff said he talked to architects and design professionals on the city’s Design Review Board and the Port Washington Main Street design committee, and none of them believed the proposed materials should be allowed.

Instead, Tetzlaff said, they recommended 12-by-24-inch white exterior tiles be used for the work.

“The opinion is that this is not a suitable material,” he said. “There are other reasonable alternatives.”

“I think they’re trying to play down the middle of the road. That’s not where we want to be,” commission member Ron Voigt said. “I think they fix it up or they tear it down.”

Mayor Scott Huebner, the commission chairman, expressed frustration with the situation. When the firm purchased the building in late 2007 and talked to city officials and residents about their plans, he said, they promised a quality project.

“One of the principals even said he’d sell his house if it didn’t make the city better,” Huebner said. “Now they’re coming back and trying to put cheap plastic materials on a historic building.

“What they originally said and what they’re trying to do are complete opposites.”

Representatives of Port Harbor Investments could not be reached for comment.

 
City to sharpen downtown upgrade plans PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 23 June 2010 18:08

Commission will review TIF proposal calling for $2.3 million in projects, including improvements to parking lots, coal dock

A host of downtown infrastructure improvements — everything from revamped parking lots and alleys to the conversion of Harborview Lane to a pedestrian way — will be discussed by the Port Washington Plan Commission Thursday, June 24.

The improvements, as well as proposed developer incentives, are among the projects in a tax-incremental financing plan that will be reviewed during a 6:30 p.m. public hearing.

“We’re trying to make it a more friendly downtown, especially with the changes to the parking lots to improve traffic flow and the alleys to improve pedestrian movement,” City Administrator Mark Grams said. 

“By making the downtown more attractive, hopefully we’ll attract more businesses there.”

The work will also demonstrate the city’s desire to see the downtown redeveloped, officials said.

The projects were scheduled to be reviewed for the first time on Wednesday by the TIF Joint Review Board, which is primarily made up of representatives of the various governmental units affected by the district.

The proposed district, which would contain properties valued at more than $13 million, would zigzag through the heart of downtown and include a number of vacant buildings that officials have said are ripe for redevelopment.

When these buildings are redeveloped, the increased property taxes would be used to pay for the estimated $2.3 million in public improvements included in the plan. The money must be repaid within 27 years.

“This will give us the opportunity to do these project without putting the burden on the taxpayers,” Grams said.

Among the expenditures and projects included in the proposed TIF plan are:

  • $90,000 for improvements to the coal dock.
  • $450,000 in improvements to downtown parking lots, including significant changes to the lot behind Smith Bros. Marketplace.
  • $40,000 for alley improvements, most of which are aimed at making it easier for people to get from Franklin Street to the lakefront.
  • $20,000 for downtown signs.
  • $750,000 in developer incentives.
  • Officials have said the incentives are needed to attract businesses to the larger vacant buildings downtown.
  • $390,000 for street improvements, including the changes to Harborview Lane near the north-slip marina — a project that officials said will provide a landscaped walkwayleading from downtown to the stairs that lead to the historic Light Station atop St. Mary’s Hill — the creation of a cul-de-sac at the end of South Milwaukee Street and elimination of the cul-de-sac at the east end of East Main Street.

A few of the TIF projects could be undertaken as soon as next year, Grams said, such as streetscaping and leveling of sidewalks on East Grand Avenue.

“Most of the big projects would be done in 2012 or later,” Grams said, including the conversion of Harborview Lane and improvements to the parking lot behind Smith Bros. Marketplace.

The TIF district is an important aspect of the city’s downtown redevelopment strategy, he said, but it’s not the only piece of the puzzle.

The economy, which has stifled development throughout the country, will play a major part, Grams said.

“Everything’s still tied into the economy,” he said.

Franklin Energy’s move to downtown will also help with redevelopment efforts, he said. The growing firm will move into the second floor of the Smith Bros. Marketplace building, bringing a significant influx of employees to the downtown.

“You’ll have more workers downtown generating more traffic for the stores there,” Grams said. “Hopefully, other businesses will come downtown with this added traffic.

“Will it happen overnight? Probably not. But in the long term, with the improvements we’re making, hopefully we can make a difference.”

Following Thursday’s public hearing at City Hall, the Plan Commission is expected to make a recommendation on the TIF district borders and plans to the Common Council.

Aldermen are expected to take up the matter when they meet on Tuesday, July 6. The Joint Review Board must then approve the borders and plans before they are submitted to the state for final approval.

 
City to change pond plan for Hwy. 33 work PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 16 June 2010 18:28

Port’s decision to relocate stormwater facility near Hwy. LL not likely to delay long-awaited project

With little discussion Tuesday, Port Washington aldermen agreed to move a planned stormwater detention pond that will be built as part of the long-awaited Highway 33 reconstruction.

Fears that the change in plans for the highway would delay the project may not come to fruition, Public Works Director Rob Vanden Noven said.

“I’ve talked to the designer, who is determined to let nothing stop the schedule,” Vanden Noven said, adding he was meeting with officials on Wednesday to discuss the project and its schedule. “It’s certainly possible to keep it on schedule, and we intend to do so.”

The reason, he said, is that the city made a quick decision in the matter.

City officials took a second look at the detention pond planned for the former Kolbach farm at the southwest corner of highways LL and 33 after learning it would not alleviate flooding in the area, especially near Second Avenue.

A study done by the engineering firm Bonestroo and reviewed by aldermen Tuesday revealed showed the planned pond would not handle the water from a two-year storm.

That is the biggest reason the city should move the pond to an area south of the Aurora medical Clinic on the southeast corner of the interchange, Ald. Tom Hudson said.

Building a 19-acre regional stormwater detention pond there, and doing some minor grading, would mean the facility could handle even a 100-year storm, according to the study.

“If we can fix it, let’s do so,” Hudson said, noting flooding problems have plagued area residents for years.

Matthew Bednarski, an engineer with Bonestroo, said that moving the pond will also help the city meet Department of Natural Resources water quality standards in 2013.

It would also allow the city to abandon the current dry stormwater pond in the Bley Park subdivision, Bednarski said, creating as many as two residential lots that could be sold.

The cost of the new pond was estimated at $535,000, Bednarski said. As much as $135,000 of that could be covered by a state grant, he said.

In addition, because it would create a regional stormwater pond, the city could assess future developers for part of the cost, Bednarski said.

He recommended the city negotiate with the Department of Transportation to ensure funds planned for the current pond would be transferred to the new facility.

The former Kolbach farm would lie fallow under the new plan, Vanden Noven told the council, noting that the state has restricted access to the property.

“It can’t be developed for anything,” he said.

The plan will, however, allow the city to keep a stand of woods that separates the Bley Park subdivision from Highway 33, something that’s important to residents there, Vanden Noven said.

The Highway 33 project, which runs from Tower Drive in Port Washington to just east of Highway W in Saukville, involves replacing the existing two-lane road with a four-lane divided highway, complete with turn lanes, curb and gutter, sidewalks, bike lanes, landscaping and lighting.

Three roundabouts are planned for the road. Two of them will be in Saukville, at Northwoods Road and Market Street. The third will be at the Highway LL interchange in Port.

Plans call for utility work to begin this fall and road construction next spring.

 
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