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Port Washington


City charts course for adding paramedics PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 15 September 2010 17:49

With no objections voiced at public hearing, Port officials set to pursue goal of upgrading service

A small group of people on Monday heard Port Washington fire and ambulance officials lay out their plans to upgrade to a paramedic service.

When the 30-minute public hearing ended, one resident encouraged the department to pursue its goal.

“I think the EMTs are doing a fine job, but they’re limited in what they can do,” Jim Johnson said. “I think it’s time, and we are big enough, that we should go up to this level.”

Fire Chief Mark Mitchell concurred, noting that many people in the community already believe the EMTs are paramedics.

“We almost owe it to people to provide this,” he said. “The need is there. The numbers are there. I think we’ve got all the parts needed to make this work.”

Paramedics receive a significantly higher level of training that enables them to better assess patients, administer more medications and conduct procedures that EMTs cannot perform, said Thomas Dietrich, the medical director for Columbia St. Mary’s Ozaukee Hospital.

“Those are the skills that may save your life,” he said. “In many circumstances, it could make the difference between getting to the hospital and not getting there at all.”

They are especially important in cases such as heart attacks, he said, where paramedics can administer medications that typically would be given in the hospital.

The same is true in seizure cases, where medications that paramedics administer can stop the seizure, Dietrich said.   

“The big lifesavers are cardiac meds we can give people to stop lethal arrhythmias,” he said. “A lot of this stuff, it may not happen often, but when it does, you want to be able to do these things.”

Mitchell noted that in 2009, the ambulance services had 720 calls, and he estimated 25% of those cases could have benefitted from paramedic services.

Although the department calls for Thiensville’s paramedics to meet them along the way when those services are needed, often the ambulance is almost to the hospital by the time the two meet, he said, estimating it typically takes the Thiensville service about 20 minutes to meet up with Port’s.

“That’s just too long for someone to wait for paramedic intervention,” he said.

Dietrich noted that if Port Washington upgrades to a paramedic service, it will benefit not just city residents but residents throughout northern Ozaukee County because Port’s ambulance can respond to these scenes much more quickly than Thiensville. 

The department is proposing beginning paramedic service on a part-time basis Jan. 1 and, over two years, converting to a full-time paramedic service, Mitchell said.

Four of the department EMTs are certified paramedics, and they would form the core group for the service in the first year, he added.

The city would continue to recruit paramedics on a part-time basis to fully staff the service, Mitchell said.

The cost of the conversion would be covered through increased fees charged for the paramedic service, he said.

The Police and Fire Commission, which  held the hearing, offered its support for the paramedic program as well.

Mitchell noted that the department has submitted its paramedic proposal to the state, which must approve it before the service can begin.

After the state gives its approval, the commission and the Common Council will also need to approve it, Mitchell said.

 
Vandals busted after residents aid police PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by Kristyn Halbig Ziehm   
Wednesday, 08 September 2010 18:13

Four teens arrested for mailbox-smashing spree in Port, including one awaiting sentence on felony drug charges

A group of west-side Port Washington residents who saw a car full of teenage vandals smash mailboxes with a baseball bat while speeding through their subdivision Saturday night put lawn chairs in the street to slow the vehicle — a move that allowed them to get the license-plate number and report the youths to police.

Four youths were arrested in connection with the incident, including a Grafton teenager who is awaiting sentencing on three felony counts of selling marijuana.

Andrew B. Kellett, 17, was charged in Ozaukee County court Tuesday with felony bail jumping in connection with Saturday’s incident.

He and Maxwell Savatski, 18, of Port Washington, were also charged with six misdemeanor counts of being a party to criminal damage to property for smashing six mailboxes during Saturday’s spree.

Two other 17-year-old boys from Grafton are expected to be charged with misdemeanors in connection with the incident later this week, District Attorney Adam Gerol said Tuesday.

Police lauded the actions of the residents.

“We couldn’t have done this without them,” Port Washington Police Lt. Eric Leet said. “This is a testament to the quality of our citizens, and a sign of a strong neighborhood. They look out for each other.”

Police Chief Richard Thomas said the incident had the potential for far more serious consequences.

“This could have gotten much worse,” he said. “This could have escalated. These teenagers put a lot of people at risk, including themselves.

“This was an excellent case of residents helping police.”

In the drug case against Kellett, he is accused of being a major player in a marijuana distribution ring. He was among six teens, all Grafton High students at the time, who were arrested in
April in a sting operation conducted by the county’s multi-jurisdictional drug task force.

Kellett, who pleaded guilty to three felony counts of selling marijuana, is scheduled to be sentenced in that case on Sept. 21. Gerol said last month that his office was asking Judge Paul Malloy to withhold a prison sentence and instead order Kellett to a lengthy period of probation and one year in the county jail.

Kellett was free on $5,000 bail on the conditions that he neither drink alcohol nor use controlled substances and that he observe a 10 p.m. curfew.

Saturday’s incident occurred about 11:15 p.m. when police said the youths left an underage drinking party at Savatski’s home in the Greystone subdivision on the city’s south side, driving north into the nearby Bley Park Estates subdivision at speeds estimated to be as high as 60 mph, smashing mailboxes and the taillight of a parked car.

The group of adults enjoying a campfire on Brian Court heard the car and the damage and saw the youths striking mailboxes in the area, police said. When the car turned onto Brian Court, they placed their chairs in the road to slow the vehicle as it traveled up and down the dead-end street.

Police traced the license plate number and were able to identify the driver and his passengers.

According to police, the teenagers gathered at Savatski’s home for a party earlier in the evening. Kellett told police that the other three consumed beer and smoked marijuana before deciding to smash mailboxes in the area, the complaint states.

One of the Grafton teens drove the vehicle, police said, adding that he and one of the other teens were ticketed for underage consumption of alcohol.

The driver was also cited for reckless driving, police said.

On Tuesday, Judge Sandy Williams set Kellett’s bail at $1,500 and Savatski’s at $500. She also ordered the two to have no contact with each other, and Savatski to maintain absolute sobriety.

A plea hearing for Savatski is set for Tuesday, Sept. 21. A status conference for Kellett is set for the same day.

If convicted of bail jumping, Kellett faces a maximum sentence of six years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

In the drug case, he faces a total maximum penalty of 13 years in prison and a $30,000 fine for the three counts.

He and Savatski each face a maximum nine months in jail and a $10,000 fine for each count of criminal damage to property.

 
Vandalism crackdown leads to arrest PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by Kristyn Halbig Ziehm   
Wednesday, 01 September 2010 18:10

Saukville man, 51, nabbed by Port police after trying to destroy tree on Franklin Street in front of tavern patrons

Port Washington police, who began a crackdown on downtown vandalism this past weekend, arrested a 51-year-old Saukville man early Saturday for trying to destroy a tree on Franklin Street.

The man was one of two people arrested and three cited for various violations during the expanded downtown patrols, according to police.

Seven trees in downtown have been destroyed by vandals this summer, frustrating residents, merchants and police and prompting the crackdown.

“I feel really good about this,” Police Chief Richard Thomas said. “We are not going to tolerate anyone damaging our beautiful downtown.”

The Saukville man was arrested about 2:20 a.m. Aug. 28 after two officers saw him bending over a gingko tree in the 200 block of North Franklin Street, according to police.

Lt. Eric Leet, one of the officers who witnessed the incident, said the man had been at a downtown tavern and was intoxicated. He didn’t offer a reason for his actions, Leet added.

“The explanation he offered was that he didn’t do it,” Leet said.

The man wasn’t shy about his actions, he added.

“The street was full of people,” Leet said. “It was probably witnessed by 40 to 50 bar patrons leaving downtown.”

That may work in the city’s favor, Leet noted.

“These people got to see a guy pulling on a tree arrested. To me, that would make an impact,” he said.

Police have asked the Ozaukee County district attorney’s office to charge the man with a misdemeanor count of attempting to destroy property, Thomas said.

“What a jerk,” Thomas said of the man.

If the district attorney declines to press charges because he does not believe he can meet the burden of proof required, Thomas said, police will issue the man a municipal citation for attempted damage to property. Municipal citations do not require the same burden of proof as a criminal charge.

That same hard-line stance will be followed for anyone who commits or tries to commit vandalism downtown, Thomas said.

“One way or another, they will be held accountable,” he said.

Misdemeanor charges of disorderly conduct have been requested against the other man arrested early Saturday. The 27-year-old Port Washington man was screaming and tipping over construction barricades at the intersection of Wisconsin Street and Grand Avenue about 12:30 a.m., police said.

In addition, three men were cited for open intoxicants during the early hours of Saturday and Sunday. One of the men was also cited for littering.

Leet said police have adjusted their traditional north and west patrol areas so that each one overlaps downtown on weekend evenings, allowing these officers to spend time downtown.

He also patrolled downtown, as did the bike patrol officer, all of whom were visible to people downtown, Leet said.

“There were times this weekend when we had two squads downtown as well as (the bike patrol officer),” he said. “We wanted to make a point. I, like everyone else in town, get tired of seeing the trees destroyed.”

In addition to the increased police presence, he said, two reserve police officers were posted in downtown storefronts conducting surveillance Friday and Saturday nights. If they saw anything suspicious, they radioed the officers on duty.

“We didn’t want to give up completely on our visible presence,” he said, noting that it is an effective way to prevent problems. “We’d rather prevent (actions) than catch (violators after the fact), but if we can’t prevent, we’ll settle for catching.”

The crackdown will continue as officers are available until the vandalism abates, Leet said.

“Until we start to see signs the patrons down there are willing to act responsibly, we’ll have to keep this up,” he said, noting that the program will be evaluated in a month.

“We never like to have to do the zero-tolerance thing. Discretion is part of good policing. But what we’ve been doing so far hasn’t been working, so this is the next logical step.”

Thomas said the department is in the process of creating signs for downtown businesses to post warnings of the crackdown and the fact police are watching for vandals.

In addition, he said, the city has ordered special tree guards to place around the trees near Schooner Pub and Foxy’s, where most of the trees have been broken this year, in an attempt to protect them.

In addition, anyone who witnesses vandalism is encouraged to report it via the city’s new vandalism hotline at 268-7682. A $50 reward is offered for tips leading to the arrests of vandals.

Both Leet and Thomas praised business owners who have offered their storefronts for surveillance.

“We’ve got to give the business community a big hand,” Thomas said.

 


FRUSTRATED WITH THE wanton destruction of trees along Franklin Street in downtown Port Washington, such as this gingko that was destroyed by vandals Aug. 14, police increased their night patrols beginning last weekend. It paid off when early Saturday, they arrested one man who officers say was trying to break a tree in the 200 block of Franklin Street.
Photo by Bill Schanen IV
 
New leaders, technology await PW-S students PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by Bill Schanen IV   
Wednesday, 25 August 2010 18:38

School year starts Sept. 1 with new PWHS athletic director, Saukville principal and even more SMART Boards

The Port Washington-Saukville School District will start classes next week with two new administrators and a host of technology upgrades.

Ready to greet students will be Thad Gabrielse, Port Washington High School’s new athletic director and dean of students, and Chad Brakke, principal of Saukville Elementary School.

Although the new administrators have been on the job since July, their work will begin in earnest on Wednesday, Sept. 1, when summer vacation ends for most students in Ozaukee County.

Gabrielse, the former athletic director at Howards Grove High School, replaces Activities Director Jeff Mastin in a restructured position at the high school. In addition to overseeing all athletic activities, he will also share responsibility for student supervision and discipline.

Responsibility for non-athletic extracurricular activities has been shifted to Assistant Principal David Bernander.

At Saukville Elementary School, Brakke, a former assistant principal at Rice Lake High School, has replaced longtime principal Kathy Tubbs.

Tubbs left her job after 11 years in Saukville to return to teaching. She will be a first-grade teacher at Dunwiddie Elementary School in Port Washington.

“This is really an exciting opportunity for me because Port Washington-Saukville is an outstanding district and Saukville Elementary is a great school,” Brakke said. “One of the things that has really stood out for me is the number of really positive comments I have heard in the community about the school district. That’s not necessarily the case in other districts.”

Brakke, 39, his wife and two children, who will attend Lincoln Elementary School and Thomas Jefferson Middle School, recently moved to Port Washington.

In addition to new faces, students will find new technology in their schools. The district purchased and installed 33 more SMART Boards in elementary schools, as well as at the middle and high school, this summer.

The devices, which are favorites among students and teachers, project a computer’s video output on a large interactive whiteboard.

The district used part of the $186,000 it received as a settlement in a class-action lawsuit against software giant Microsoft to pay for the boards. Parent group donations also helped fund the purchases.

“Now almost all elementary school classrooms have SMART Boards, so we continue to make huge steps in the area of technology,” Supt. Michael Weber said.

The district also recently launched a new Parent Resources section of its Web site that allows parents to read the curriculum for all subjects and grade levels to gain a better understanding of what is expected of their children.

The district’s Web site address is www.pwssd.k12.wi.us.


SAUKVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL students will meet their new principal, Chad Brakke, when they report for classes next week. Brakke is one of two new administrators in the district.   Photo by Bill Schanen IV

 
Firm given 45 days to repair former bank PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by Kristyn Halbig Ziehm   
Wednesday, 18 August 2010 18:35

If company fails to comply with order, judge says he will appoint receiver or have structure razed

Ozaukee County Circuit Judge Tom Wolfgram on Aug. 9 gave Port Harbor Investments 45 days to repair the former M&I Bank building in downtown Port Washington.

If repairs are not made by Sept. 23, Wolfgram said, he would appoint a receiver to manage the building or order the building razed, City Attorney Eric Eberhardt said.

The hearing came after the investment firm failed to repair the dilapidated building at 122 N. Franklin St. by July 16, as it had agreed to do in a stipulation signed by the company and city officials.

City Administrator Mark Grams said that while the firm’s lack of progress on the repairs is frustrating, Wolfgram’s order is promising.

“The good thing is if the work doesn’t get done, there is a definite end in sight when the judge will appoint a receiver,” he said.

A receiver is an impartial person or entity who would be accountable to the court, not the building owner, Eberhardt explained. The receiver would be responsible for determining how feasible building repairs are and to either have them made or seek a raze order. With the court’s permission, he could also sell the structure.

The receiver could be paid by the building owner or, if the building is sold, from the proceeds of the sale, Eberhardt said.

Port Harbor Investments burst onto the scene in late 2007 when it purchased the former bank and announced sweeping plans for a multi-million-dollar development that was to encompass not only that building but several other prominent downtown buildings.

The firm planned to raze the former bank and construct a new structure that featured some of the architectural elements of the existing building.

However, the firm has been unable to complete any of its other planned real-estate purchases and early renovation attempts left the bank building in shambles.

After numerous complaints from downtown businesses and residents, officials called for the building to be repaired, saying the structure had become an eyesore and safety hazard.

On Nov. 6, 2008, the city building inspector mailed the development firm a notice of zoning code and municipal code violations, ordering it to make repairs within 30 days.

Despite the fact the deadline was extended and the firm obtained a building permit for the work, the repairs were never made, the suit states.

The building was in such bad shape that the city was forced to make some exterior repairs after pieces of mortar, brick and other debris began falling from the structure in June of 2009, the lawsuit noted. The firm had been ordered to make these emergency repairs but failed to do so.

In October of 2009, the city filed its lawsuit.

 
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