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PW-S school incumbents, challenger square off PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by BILL SCHANEN IV   
Wednesday, 30 March 2016 19:33

Board election has three candidates vying for two posts as city representatives

Making his second bid for the Port Washington-Saukville School Board in as many years, Aaron Paulin will face incumbents Kelly O’Connell-Perket and Brian Stevens in the Tuesday, April 5, election.

Veteran board member O’Connell-Perket, who was first elected to the board in 1998 and currently serves as its clerk, is seeking her seventh, three-year term.

Stevens, the board’s treasurer, was appointed in 2014 to fill a seat vacated by Jim Olson and elected last year among a field of candidates that included Paulin. He is running this year for his first full term.

The top two vote-getters in next week’s race will win seats on the board representing the City of Port Washington.

As board members, the winners of the April 5 election will face new challenges, among them overseeing a $45.6 million Port Washington High School reconstruction and renovation project and the construction of a $3.8 million addition at Dunwiddie Elementary School approved by voters a year ago.

There are also ongoing challenges that include maintaining the quality of education amid reductions in state funding for public schools.

Stevens, 47, said the board’s top priority should be managing the high school project, which is scheduled to begin in earnest next month and be completed in 2019, and the Dunwidde Elementary School work, which is slated to begin next month and be completed by the end of the year.

“I think right now completing the construction projects on time and on budget with as little disruption to education as possible needs to be our top priority,” he said. 

The board has done a good job so far of overseeing the projects, Stevens said, by hiring Bray Architects to design the improvements and CD Smith Construction Services to manage the projects. He noted that both firms not only have extensive experience with school construction but have worked on projects similar to the one at Port High that entail demolishing and rebuilding a part of the school.

O’Connell-Perket, 55, agreed that the projects are off to a good start.

“I think the public has been well informed, and any time there are questions, we get answers,” she said. 

Paulin, 37, said while it’s exciting to see a significant investment in schools, there is some concern with early cost overruns at Dunwiddie Elementary School. 

“That has caused frustration for people I’ve talked to,” he said.

School officials said they expect the project to be as much as $300,000 over budget, although they are confident that savings  from the much larger high school project will more than make up the deficit.

Paulin said he is concerned about future maintenance needs, particularly at the middle school, and school security.

“We’ll have to deal with these things, and we know we can’t go back to a referendum anytime soon,” he said. 

While voters gave the School District additional money in last year’s referendum to renovate schools, the state has done the opposite with funding for public education, which puts an emphasis on setting clear priorities, the candidates said.

“On top of the list of priorities must always be kids and the people around them that create the safety net they need to succeed,” O’Connell-Perket said. 

All three candidates agreed that a well-rounded curriculum, one that focuses on the core subjects but also offers strong music, arts and technology education programs, is important.

“If we’re going to create well-rounded students, we have to give them opportunities, and those include strong arts, music and tech-ed programs,” said Paulin, a social studies teacher at West Bend West High School.

Stevens, an engineer, said the district needs to continue its focus on the STEAM initiative, which focuses on science, technology, engineering, arts and math, while maintaining its long-standing commitment to the quality of its core subjects and maintaining reasonable student-to-teacher ratios.

Another priority, Paulin said, is strengthening the relationship between the School District and its surrounding communities.

“I visited the senior center and was told that I’m the first School Board candidate to go there and show interest,” he said. “I want a chance to promote our district in the community. As a board member, it would be my responsibility to build relationships with seniors, veterans, alumni and businesses.”

O’Connell-Perket, a medical records supervisor, said those relationships already exist in many cases and it’s important to continue them. She noted the high school was able to complete its welding lab this year because of donations from area companies.

“We need to continue the wonderful relationships with our community businesses that help our district and our children,” she said. 

There are no candidates running for the School Board seat representing the towns of Grafton and Saukville, which has been vacant since Paul Krechel, who was appointed in 2014, resigned in October 2015.

Although board members represent specific areas in the School District, they are elected at large, which means district residents vote for all candidates.

 
Brakke is lone district candidate for principal job PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by BILL SCHANEN IV   
Wednesday, 23 March 2016 18:30

Saukville Elementary School official among 14 applicants for middle-school position

Saukville Elementary School Principal Chad Brakke is the lone internal candidate to replace longtime Thomas Jefferson Middle School Principal Arlan Galarowicz, Port Washington-Saukville School Supt. Michael Weber said.

Brakke, a former Rice Lake administrator who was hired to lead the Saukville school in 2010, is among 14 candidates for the middle school job.

Liz Ferger, the middle school’s longtime assistant principal, did not apply for the position, Weber said.

“Liz will be part of the interview team and is excited to work with her new partner,” he said.

Galarowicz, the longest-serving administrator currently working in the district, announced in December he will retire at the end of the school year after 22 years at the helm at one of the district’s two largest schools.

Galarowicz, who was hired in 1993 to succeed Joe Groh, said in December that recent health problems require him to reduce stress and get more sleep, which is impossible to do as principal of an 800-student school.

“If you’re serious about education, Thomas Jefferson is the place you want to be, but I need to make a change,” said Galarowicz, who is regarded as a visionary and tireless advocate for students.

He said he intends to remain involved in education in some capacity, but not locally.

“The question for me was, do I want to continue what I’m doing and literally die on the job or do I want to leave with as much health as possible and be able to remain in education in some way?” Galarowicz said.

Administrators planned to create an interview team this week and begin screening candidates. The team is expected to make a recommendation to the School Board by May 9, Weber said.

Applicants must have three years of leadership experience, a master’s degree in education administration and a Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction principal’s license.

 
City fights proposed 120-foot downtown telecom pole PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 16 March 2016 17:58

Port council quickly adopts resolution in hopes of convincing Illinois firm to construct spire elsewhere

News that an Illinois firm has proposed building a 120-foot-tall telecommunications pole in downtown Port Washington prompted aldermen to quickly adopt a resolution regulating placement of such structures.

Aldermen made few comments on the issue before unanimously approving the resolution, which would give the city some say in where these structures could be located.

Officials said they hope to work with Wisconsin Technology Networking to find a location that will accommodate both the company’s needs and minimize the impact on the community.

Tuesday’s action came after the city received what City Attorney Eric Eberhardt called a generic application to use a portion of the public right of way near the intersection of North Milwaukee and West Main streets for the tapered pole, which would be topped with a microwave dish.

Eberhardt noted the proposed structure would dwarf a standard 40-foot telephone pole, and said the city zoning code for the area limits the height of structures to 85 feet.

“A 120-foot-tall pole sitting in the right of way in the industrial park would be less dramatic than this location,” he said.

The city needs to respond to the request within 30 days, he added, or it is considered  to be approved. The city received the application on March 3.

“The clock is running,” Eberhardt told the Common Council. “It’s important that if the city is to respond to this application in a meaningful way, it act (on the resolution) this evening.”

Wisconsin Technology Networking of Schaumburg, Ill., wants to place the 40-inch diameter pole in the parkway on the north side of Main Street directly across from the Ozaukee County Administration Center and west of Poole Funeral Home.

The company wants to build the structure within the next 18 months, according to its application.

The “transport utility pole” would be used to provide high-speed, high-capacity bandwidth in order to facilitate the next generation of devices and data-driven services,” Eberhardt told aldermen, and facilitate such things as driverless and connected vehicles, remote weather stations and mobile service providers.

Under state law, telecommunications utilities have the right to place facilities in the right of way subject to “reasonable municipal regulations,” Eberhardt said.

Although the city requires contractors excavating in the right of way to obtain a permit, it has no regulations or standards set for these permits, Eberhardt said.

Those standards can take into account whether the use is contrary to public health, safety and welfare, the amount of space in the right of way that’s available, competing demands for the space, the availability of other locations for the facility and the applicability of city ordinances — such as the zoning code, he said.

“You’re going to potentially have some of those concerns,” Eberhardt said.

The city’s resolution, which outlines the city’s desire to minimize the number of obstructions and excavations in the right of way, was adapted from a Madison ordinance, he said.

 
Contaminants found in north slip parking lot PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 09 March 2016 20:13

But city officials say minor levels shouldn’t be stumbling block in negotiations for Blues Factory project 

A recently completed environmental study of the north slip parking lot eyed for the Blues Factory shows that there is minor contamination of the former industrial site that is contained by the asphalt surface, which serves as a cap.

If the property is not developed, the city likely would not have to remediate it, the study states. But if it is developed, whatever soil is disturbed would have to be dealt with appropriately and the development would  likely serve as the new cap.

“The report looks pretty good,” Mayor Tom Mlada said. “There wasn’t the significant contamination we feared there could be.”

City Administrator Mark Grams agreed.

“There are some heavy metals, but they don’t seem to be concentrated,” he said, adding it does not appear that remediation would be a stumbling block to development of the property.

The city is negotiating with developer Chris Long to sell the parking lot for the Blues Factory, a Paramount Records-themed entertainment venue.

The city hired Konicek Environmental Consulting to conduct phase one and two environmental tests of the parking lot last spring, given the property’s previous life as a manufacturing facility — in part as home to the Wisconsin Chair Co., the parent company of Paramount Records.

Negotiations between the city and Long are continuing, Grams said, noting officials plan to meet with him this week.

“There are still things that have to be worked out,” he said. “We’re kind of getting to the nitty gritty.”

Finances have been the bulk of the negotiations so far, he said, noting work on a developer’s agreement for the project hasn’t started yet.

The potential remediation of the parking lot site is likely to be a topic of the negotiations. City officials have said they could potentially seek grants to pay for the work, although Grams said that if the contamination is minor that may not be necessary.

The Feb. 22 environmental report, compiled by Konicek Environmental Consulting, showed there was no methane or volatile organic compounds above regulatory standards.

Lead and another compound, PAH benzo flouranthene, were found to be above that level, the report states.

The major cause of concern is the PAH benzo flouranthene, which is a byproduct of combustion, said Greg Konicek.

The contamination that has been found is what is expected on a so-called brownfield site, he said, adding he would describe it as minor contamination.

“It’s almost commonplace in any pre-developed urban property,” Konicek said.

The Department of Natural Resources has opened a case file on the parking lot property, Konicek said, and will be seeking a report on the steps to be taken to close the case.

Retaining the parking lot as a cap would likely be enough to close the case file, he added, although any development of the property would reopen the case. The developer would then have to file a plan to deal with any soil that’s disturbed.

 
Dunwiddie remodeling project comes in over bid PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by BILL SCHANEN IV   
Wednesday, 02 March 2016 19:43

Overrun for upgrades to elementary school might reach $300,000, but officials say other costs can be cut

The Dunwiddie Elementary School expansion and remodeling project slated to begin this spring is nearly $107,000 over budget with two proposals outstanding, according to bids approved by the Port Washington-Saukville School Board last week. 

With 37 of the 39 bids approved, the project cost stands at $3.76 million.

A total of $3.8 million has been earmarked for an addition on the westside Port Washington school, but that includes a contingency of $151,000. The working budget, minus the contingency, is $3.65 million.

Director of Business Services Jim Froemming said the deficit will probably approach $300,000 after the last two bids and various fees are accounted for, but officials are not concerned.

“As a matter of fact, we’re pleased with where the bids came in given how the construction industry has picked up,” Supt. Michael Weber said. 

The fear was that as the economic recovery stimulates the construction industry, contractors would become more selective and less likely to offer lower prices that were the norm during the recession, especially for relatively small projects like the addition at Dunwiddie Elementary School.

But in addition to receiving what they characterized as favorable bids, officials pointed out they still have a contingency and expect to more than account for a deficit on the Dunwiddie project with savings on the much larger and more expensive Port Washington High School project.

In April, voters approved spending $49.4 million on Dunwiddie Elementary School and the high school, which will undergo a sweeping renovation that includes the demolition and reconstruction of part of the building.

“Yes, we know we’re over budget by a little bit at Dunwiddie, but we’re approaching this as one big project, so if we’re over by $300,000 or so at Dunwiddie, that’s a small fraction of the total project cost,” Froemming said. “We know that if we need to make them, small changes in the high school project can save a substantial amount of money.”

Officials were encouraged by the bids for a retaining wall that will facilitate the construction of a three-story academic wing on the hill on the west side of the high school. The complex engineering project will require 85 pillars of reinforced concrete to be driven 25 feet into the ground, said Greg Sabel, director of construction management for CD Smith, the construction management firm hired to oversee the school projects. 

The contract for the project, which was estimated to cost $660,000, was awarded to Midwest Drilled Foundations of Waukesha for $545,000 — $115,000 under budget.

For the Dunwiddie Elementary School project, CD Smith was awarded $1.3 million of the $3.8 contracts approved by the board, primarily for concrete, masonry and steel work. According to the firm’s contract with the district, it can “self-perform” work on the projects, but its bids are evaluated by the district. All other bids are evaluated by CD Smith, which then recommends the top proposals to the board.

Officials said they were pleased that two Port Washington companies submitted low bids for work on the elementary school. A  bid of $314,100 for heating, ventilation and air conditioning work from J&H Heating and bids totalling $404,155 for earth work from Dave’s Excavation were accepted by the board.

In addition, the board accepted a bid of $59,496 from Cornerstone Carpentry Contractor of Grafton for finish carpentry work.

“I was very pleased to see local contractors  came through,” Weber said.

 
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