Share this page on facebook
Port Washington

Environmental questions stall plan to market lakefront land PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 01 April 2015 21:48

Port officials say tests may be needed because land was site of factory

    Port Washington officials who have fast-tracked a controversial plan to seek development proposals for a city-owned parcel of lakefront land will be asked next week to conduct an additional environmental assessment of the property.

    If approved, it would delay the city’s quest for development proposals, although Randy Tetzlaff, the city’s director of planning and development, said he did not know how long the work would take.

    Although the city has not received the results of an initial environmental assessment of the parking lot at the end of the north slip, that study will likely recommend the extra work, Tetzlaff said Tuesday.

    For decades before it was converted to a parking lot, the property was home to industrial buildings — most notably, the Wisconsin Chair Co.

    “We don’t know what’s there,” Tetzlaff said. “If I’m going to look to put a development there, I want to know what’s there.”

    Typically, the assessment will involve doing soil borings to determine if contaminants are present, Tetzlaff said.

    If they are, aldermen will have to decide whether to remediate the site, he said.

    The condition of the site will influence the design of whatever building is placed there, Tetzlaff said. If a developer can create a lower level to house mechanical systems, it can minimize the building footprint and maximize public space on the lot, he said.

    Even if the city moves ahead with the additional assessment, Tetzlaff said, the general timeline for development proposals remains.

    After the request for proposals is issued, developers will have 75 days to respond, after which the city will have 30 days to vet the proposals, he said.

    Officials had hoped to complete the process in early July.

    The city’s decision to seek development proposals has drawn the ire of residents who believe the municipality should not sell valuable lakefront property but instead keep it public.

    But officials note that the city owns miles of lakefront land. This site, they said, offers the community the opportunity to make property available for a project that could spur redevelopment throughout the downtown.

    Developers Chris Long of Madison and Gertjan van den Broek of Port Washington have already approached the city with their plan to create a Paramount Blues-themed museum, restaurant, performance space and banquet hall on the property, noting the Wisconsin Chair Co. was the parent company of Paramount Records.

What to do with underused parks PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 25 March 2015 20:31

Port alderman identifies seven parcels he believes city should consider selling

    Port Washington Ald. Bill Driscoll  told the Parks and Recreation Board earlier this month that he has identified seven park and open space parcels he believes the city could put up for sale.

    The lands, he said, are underused and proceeds from the sales could be used to maintain the remaining parks and open spaces in the city.

    “A lot of the parks are deteriorating,” Driscoll told the board March 12. “Where’s the money coming from to fix them up?

    “Instead of having a whole lot of parks, maybe we’ve got to have fewer parks in great shape.”

    Driscoll said he began his quest to get the city to sell unused and underused properties it owns after going through the last budget cycle as a member of the Finance and License Committee.

    Tight budgets are affecting every department, he said.

    “It doesn’t look real good,” he said, noting park equipment is costly to maintain. “It’s the same with our streets. The question is do we want to have a bunch of empty parks.”

    It’s not just parks he is looking at, Driscoll said, but every parcel of land the city owns.

    “It is a fiscal issue. It started as a fiscal thing for the parks,” he said.

    Ald. Kevin Rudser, a member of the board, said a recent park study showed the city has a higher than average amount of parkland per person than most communities.

    Board member Sue Kinas said the city needs to define what a park is, noting it isn’t always a parcel with play equipment. Open space is also important, she said.

    “A lot of people like open space,” Parks and Recreation Director Charlie Imig said.

    Imig said the parcels identified by Driscoll as properties that could be sold include:

    • West Side Park at the corner of Grand Avenue and Park Street.

    • Oakland Avenue Green, which was donated to the city by We Energies, on Oakland Avenue between Division Street and Coe Street.

    • A 60-foot-wide former water tower site between Grand Avenue and Larabee Street that is maintained by the Parks Department.

    • A landlocked parcel in the Lake Ridge Subdivision.

    • A small parcel bordered by Jackson and Lake streets and the water filtration plant, maintained by the Water Department.

    • A piece of city-owned property in the gully off Whitefish Road.

    • Kaiser Park, a parcel along the ravine just north of Hales Trail.

    Driscoll said he plans to meet with City Administrator Mark Grams to identify other city-owned parcels that could potentially be sold.

    He will also meet with Parks Board members Patti Lemkuil and Ron Voigt to take a closer look at the city’s parklands before moving forward with his plan.

    Some of the parcels may have deed restrictions limiting their use and ownership, Driscoll said, but that shouldn’t stop the city from considering their future.

    “Personally, I believe they (deed restrictions) can be overcome,” he said.

    Just because a parcel is looked at by the group doesn’t mean it will be sold, Driscoll said.

    “If we decide it’s going to be green space forever, that’s fine,” he said. “At least we’ve look at it and decided.”

City poised to accept lakefront development plans PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 18 March 2015 19:57

Port council approves document that will be used to seek proposals for property off north slip

    Port Washington aldermen on Tuesday approved the document they will use to seek development proposals for a lakefront parking lot off the north slip that the city owns.

    Aldermen praised the document for its simplicity, which they said allows for a variety of uses to be proposed for the site.

    “I like the way it’s written, short and sweet,” Ald. Dan Becker said.

    Like the proposal for the Cedar Vineyard subdivision on the city’s south side, the city has taken care with the request for proposals to ensure the public will continue to have access to the lakefront, Becker noted.

    “I look at this and, yes, we’re looking at potential development here but the harborwalk remains,” he said. “The public will have access to the waterfront.”

    At the same time, it allows the city to move forward a development proposal with the potential to have a major economic impact on the downtown, Mayor Tom Mlada said.

    “That lot is the one strategic redevelopment site we own,” he said. “We can still do things like this that have the right economic impact on the city.”

    The controversial plan to sell the city property has already elicited one proposal from developers Chris Long of Madison and Gertjan van den Broek of Port Washington, who said they want to create a Paramount Blues-themed museum, restaurant, performance space and banquet hall on the property.

    City officials expect to receive a number of proposals for the land, noting about a half-dozen firms have called to ask about the property.

    The request for proposals approved Tuesday allows developers to either buy or lease the land, noting the appraised value of the property is $575,000 but terms are negotiable.

    The request for proposals asks that any development meet the city criteria, said Randy Tetzlaff, the city’s director of planning and development.

    It should be a destination that makes efficient use of the site, seamlessly integrates the streetscape, landscape and the harbor walk and will have a catalytic economic impact on downtown.

    It should adhere to the city’s master redevelopment plan, which calls for a commercial and retail use in a building that’s no more than two stories tall and the building design should honor the existing urban fabric.

    The property is currently zoned central business district, which allows for a variety of commercial and residential uses, the request notes.    

    Anyone submitting a development proposal is required to include an architectural plan, a detailed project schedule, completed value of the project and a resume of the development team and its experience, the request states. They must also submit any special assistance required for the project and information demonstrating they have the wherewithal to fund the project.

    The request for proposals is expected to go out to developers once a preliminary environmental assessment for the property is completed.

    After that, developers will have 75 days to submit their proposals.    

    The proposals will be reviewed by a committee comprised of members of the Community Development Authority and city staff, who will determine which developers will be invited to interviews.

    The CDA will interview the developers, and their concepts will be reviewed by the Plan Commission and Design Review Board.

    Based on their input, the CDA will recommend a developer to the Common Council.

    Although the request for proposals currently calls for proposals to be due on June 5 and the Common Council to award a contract around July 7, that timeline may be delayed depending on when the environmental assessment is completed, Tetzlaff said.

NOAA brings sanctuary plan to Port PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 11 March 2015 20:13

Officials tout preservation of shipwrecks as one of many benefits Great Lakes designation would give city 

    Ellen Brody told the story of the steamer Senator to a crowd of more than 50 people at Port Washington City Hall Tuesday.

    It was a ship built in 1896 in Michigan, she said, and it sailed the Great Lakes for years. On Oct. 31, 1929 — Halloween — it left Milwaukee bound for Detroit but in dense fog it was struck by the Marquette, an ore carrier.

    “The Senator did not fare well,” Brody said. It sank off Port Washington and between seven and 10 of its 31 crew members were lost.

    The ship, which was found by divers in 450 to 500 feet of water in 2005, was carrying 250 to 260 new Nash automobiles, she said.

    “It makes you kind of wonder, what do those automobiles look like today,” Brody said. “My guess is they’re extremely well preserved.”

    The cold, deep waters of Lake Michigan help preserve shipwrecks, said Brody, and it’s the envy of her colleagues at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

    That environment, along with the number of wrecks in the waters between Port Washington and Two Rivers, are among the reasons the 875 square mile area is being considered as a national marine sanctuary by NOAA.

    The proposed sanctuary is one of two potential sites listed on an inventory by the agency.

    A 2008 study by the Wisconsin State Historical Society shows the area has 34 known shipwrecks, including two of the oldest in Wisconsin, said Brody, NOAA’s regional coordinator for the Great Lakes. Fourteen of the wrecks are intact, and four have standing masts, which is unusual, she said.

    Fifteen of these wrecks are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, she added.

    “What’s not on this list is the other reason for the nomination, the opportunity for new discoveries,” Brody said.

    Sanctuaries are a lot like national parks, except they’re underwater, Brody told the crowd. They run the gamut from areas with protected coral reefs to habitat for humpback whales, and they range in size from 200 square miles to 90,000 square miles.

    “Sanctuaries vary greatly,” she said.

    The primary reason for a sanctuary is to protect a resource, and in the case of the proposed Port-to-Two Rivers sanctuary, it’s to protect shipwrecks, she said.

    They are also intended to be sources of education and outreach, research and monitoring and community engagement, she said.

    While many people fear that sanctuaries will be kept off limits, that’s not the case, Brody said.

    “That is not the case in national marine sanctuaries,” she said.

    Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and Great Lakes Maritime Heritage Center in Alpena, Mich., the only Great Lakes sanctuary, has no restrictions on fishing or diving, Brody said, adding it’s likely that similar rules would be enforced if a Port-to-Two Rivers sanctuary is approved.

    The basic rules are that people cannot move or take artifacts from the wrecks, she said.

    “Enforcement’s tough,” she conceded, noting NOAA depends on the Coast Guard and Department of Natural Resources to enforce the rules in Michigan.

    Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary on Lake Huron was designated a sanctuary in 2000, and was recently expanded from 448 square miles to 4,300 square miles, Brody said.

    “We have deep shipwrecks, shallow shipwrecks,” she said. “Some are intact. Some are broken up. They all have stories.”

    A buoy program installs mooring buoys on some of the wrecks, giving boaters somewhere to tie up so they don’t cast nets or drop anchors on the shipwrecks, damaging them, she said.

    The visitor’s center at Thunder Bay is the largest of the facilities at a NOAA sanctuary, Brody said, noting not all sanctuaries have such facilities.

    In the case of the proposed Port-to-Two Rivers sanctuary, she said, NOAA would have a presence in each of the communities — and probably not have a visitor’s center in each one.

     Community  support and involvement is an important element, Brody said.

    A marine sanctuary is a destination, Brody added, noting Alpena, a community of 10,000 people, had almost 100,000 visitors in 2014.

    “The whole identity of Alpena has changed,” she said. “They no longer consider themselves an industrial town.”

    Instead, they consider the community a tourist destination, she said.    

    Brody warned the crowd that just because the local area is on the inventory for consideration to become a sanctuary, it won’t necessarily occur.

    “I will go out on a limb and say I believe we will (move forward with the process),” she said, primarily because the application put forth by Port Washington, Sheboygan, Manitowoc and Two Rivers is “very persuasive.”

    One woman questioned why NOAA wouldn’t want to add an area as rich in wrecks and history to its sanctuaries.

    “You’d think with such a rich shipwreck history, NOAA would jump on it,” she said.noaa

    The long process ensures success for the sanctuaries, Brody said.

    “It’s pretty new,” she said. “We’re being deliberate. We’re being careful. The product at the end is strong.”

    “Be patient,” Brody told the crowd, noting that once an area is selected for designation, the process can take several years. “I will be your advocate.”


City explores TIF options for proposed subdivision PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 04 March 2015 21:43

Officials weigh cost impact but remain confident that financing district is viable for Cedar Vineyard development

    Although the final report isn’t completed, the possibility of creating a tax incremental financing district for the Cedar Vineyard subdivision proposed for Port Washington’s south side still looks good, City Administrator Mark Grams said Tuesday.

    The city is continuing to look at both the cost of infrastructure improvements such as utility extensions, a bike path, road repair and land acquisition, he said, as well as the potential boundaries of the district.

    That’s because the city may try to connect a portion of the industrial park to the TIF district to accommodate such projects as an expansion of Construction Forms, Grams said.

    But to do this, he said, the city will have to work with Anchor Bank to create a connection between the subdivision on the former VK Development land and the industrial park.

    “They have indicated they’re willing to work with us,” Grams said.

    Grams said the city is struggling to come up with reliable cost estimates for the extension of sewer and water service to the Cedar Vineyard subdivision on Highway C.

    The Cedar Vineyard subdivision would have 73 home sites, a 100-acre nature conservancy, vineyard and winery on the former VK Development property.

    Officials have said the Cedar Vineyard development is expected to be valued at more than $50 million when completed, with the value of the homes and lots expected to range from $650,000 to $880,000.

    In his preliminary calculations, Grams said, he looked at the worst-case scenario, with the utilities costing $6 million and the value of the lots being 25% less than the developer anticipates.

    But, Grams said Tuesday, the cost estimate to extend the utilities has been fluctuating as the project engineers look at different ways to extend those services.

    “There are ways to cut costs, and that’s what we’re looking at,” Grams said.

    Despite the changes, Grams said he still believes the $6 million figure is “probably in the ballpark.”

    And that number means a TIF district is still feasible, he said, noting that he still hasn’t included the value of the project’s vineyard and winery in those calculations.

    “That gives us a little wiggle room,” he said.

    The city is looking at whether it can include a $1 million contribution toward the purchase of a 101-acre nature preserve as a TIF project in the plan, Grams said.

    If Ozaukee County balks and won’t help fund the project, the city will consider whether it can contribute the entire $2 million needed, he added.

    “We would look at it and see if we can handle it,” he said. “I don’t know if the TIF could handle it.”

    Mayor Tom Mlada said that while the city is willing to consider that option, he is confident the county will contribute half the funding for the nature preserve.

    “I know you’re not going to move everybody to the yes camp,” he said. “But I think when people really consider the impact this could have not only to the city but to the county, I’m confident this will happen.”

    Grams said he hopes to have a draft TIF plan and district borders for the March 17 Common Council meeting.   

<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 8 of 65