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Port Washington


Street Fest returns to Port Sunday PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 23 May 2012 18:47

Fifth annual community celebration will feature music, vendors and more

The fifth annual Port Washington Community Street Festival will be held from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, May 27.

    Franklin Street will be closed off for the festival, which is a celebration of the community and its downtown.

    “This is a great opportunity for people to support their local businesses,” said Cathy Wilger, chairman of the festival’s organizing committee.

    This year’s event will include many of the attractions found in previous years — booths by city businesses, a bounce house, chalk drawings, face painting, a Port Washington Firer Department truck, the police department’s DARE vehicle and children’s games.

    The Disney princesses — including Cinderella, Belle, Jasmine and Mary Poppins and perhaps Snow White — will be on hand from 1 to 4 p.m. outside Pear & Simple, and a princess boutique will be set up next door so youngsters can primp for their visit with royalty, Wilger said.  

    A hole-in-one contest will be held in Rotary Park throughout the day. Golfers will try their hand at hitting a ball onto a hole set in a boat in the west slip.

    The Port Washington Yacht Club will be offering free boat rides throughout the festival, with a shuttle taking people from Franklin Street to the marina, Wilger said.

    Port Washington Main Street, which sponsors the festival, will begin to participate in foursquare, where people can check in using their smartphones to accumulate points for various rewards, Excutive Director Sara Grover said.

    In addition, Main Street will begin selling naming rights to the trees, planters, bike racks and benches that line Franklin Street, she said. The street festival began when Franklin Street was reconstructed and amenities like these were placed along it.

    More than 70 vendors, including businesses and service clubs, will line Franklin Street to sell a variety of items, including children’s books, fresh produce, plants and baked goods.

    Duluth Trading Co., which will open in the Smith Bros. Marketplace building, will have a booth, as will the Port Washington Historical Society, which is purchasing two downtown buildings for its archives and a museum.

    Northern Cross Science Foundation will set up telescopes so people can safely view the sun, she said.

    Ozaukee Sports Center will offer laser tag, and a number of city restaurants will have their specialties on hand for purchase.

    A full lineup of entertainment will be part of the festival. Wilger said that at the Performing Arts Stage in front of Port Washington State Bank, Port Washington High School’s award winning a capella group Limited Edition will perform at 12:30 p.m. followed by Impact Dance from 1:30 to 3 p.m. and Lake Shore Dance from 3:30 to 4 p.m.

    Otto Day and the Nites will play at the South Stage beginning at 1 p.m. and Soul Kitchen will be at the north stage beginning at 12:30 p.m.

 
Preschool plan for church riles neighbors PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 16 May 2012 17:52

Ozaukee Christian School’s proposal for facility at Friedens Church sparks protests about traffic, parking

    A proposal by Ozaukee Christian School to open a preschool at Friedens Church this fall hit a snag Tuesday after several neighbors objected to the use.

    “It is a residential neighborhood. I’d like to protect the integrity of it,” said Stacey Berg, 431 N. Milwaukee St. “I’m concerned with traffic on a daily basis, with the noise. Our street is extremely narrow.”

    Celia Shaughnessy, 425 N. Milwaukee St., concurred.    

    “We have a lot of children in our neighborhood,” she said, and traffic is a major concern.

    Parking is another concern, added Jane Kircher, 504 Harrison St.

    Principal Kris Austin said she would work with the neighbors to alleviate their concerns.

    “I give you my pledge we will work with you as a good neighbor,” she told the residents during a public hearing on a conditional use permit for the preschool.

    Austin told the Common Council that plans are to have two preschool classes of 10 to 12 students during the first year. If the demand is there, the preschool could expand in the future, she added.

    Classes would be in the morning on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays or Tuesdays and Thursdays, she said.

    Austin noted that from 1992 to 1995 Ozaukee Christian School was located in Friedens Church, 454 N. Milwaukee St.

    More than 50 children attended the school then, she said.

    “We didn’t, to my knowledge, have any problems with our neighbors,” she said. “We did our best and it seemed to work.”

    Friedens isn’t going to be home to the preschool forever, Austin said.

    “We’re not seeing this as a long-term solution,” she said.

    “In our heart of hearts, we would like to bring the preschool to our school,” she said, noting that kindergarten through eighth grade classes are held in Immaculate Conception School in Saukville.

    Housing the preschool and elementary classes in one building would result in significant efficiencies to their operation, Austin said.

    But despite Austin’s pledge to work with the neighbors to alleviate their concerns, the neighbors were adamant.

    “I appreciate that, but it doesn’t matter,” Berg said. “A daily preschool is not something I would be behind.”

    Neighbors are willing to live with the noise and traffic during the annual Vacation Bible School, but regular classes during the school year are different, she noted.

    “This is everyday,” Berg said.

    Ald. Jim Vollmar suggested the city could place a limit on the number of students enrolled during the first year and review the conditional use permit after that time to see how it works.

    Aldermen voted 5-2, with Dan Becker and Dave Larson opposing, to table action on the permit until their Wednesday, June 6, meeting. This, they said, would give school officials a chance to meet with neighbors and try to hammer out an agreement with them over the preschool.

    Ald. Paul Neumyer also suggested the Police Department look at traffic concerns in the neighborhood.

    “I would like to slow this down a little bit so they (the school) can talk to the neighbors and we can talk to police about the traffic,” he said.

 
Judge forbids teen burglar to see friends PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by BILL SCHANEN IV   
Wednesday, 09 May 2012 17:51

Port 16-year-old who stole handgun from house spared prison but gets jail, probation with no-contact provision


    A 16-year-old Port Washington teenager who broke into a house and stole a handgun was spared time in prison but will spend the summer in the county jail.

    Then he better start looking for new friends.

    After withholding a prison sentence during a hearing Tuesday, Ozaukee County Circuit Judge Sandy Williams placed Joshua J. Young on probation for three years, then asked him who his friends are.

    Young, whose rationale for having a felony record at such a young age includes hanging around with a bad crowd and drug or alcohol use, named six friends. His parents added another name.

    Williams ordered him not to have contact with the friends he named for the duration of his probation.

    Young, who was 15 when he committed his crimes and was waived into adult court, pleaded no contest to a felony count of burglary becoming armed with a dangerous weapon for the Feb. 21 burglary of a house not far from his home on Port Washington’s west side.

    As a condition of probation, Williams ordered Young, who has been in jail awaiting a resolution to his case, to remain there until Sept. 1.

    “Then you’ll have a couple of days to get ready for school,” Williams said.

     Young also pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor charge of concealing stolen property and guilty to misdemeanor marijuana possession in connection with the Feb. 21 burglary.

    In addition, he pleaded no contest to misdemeanor charges of theft and concealing stolen property for what he called “car shopping,” or stealing items, mainly electronics, from cars. Police discovered the stolen items while investigating the burglary.

    Williams placed him on probation for two years for the misdemeanors.

    Four other misdemeanor charges were dismissed as part of a plea agreement.

    “You’re not unfamiliar to me, Mr. Young,” Williams said, referring to Young’s juvenile record.

    In response to questions from the judge, Young acknowledged he had appeared before Williams about a month before the burglary on a juvenile charge. He recalled that he apologized and said he wouldn’t break the law again.

    “A thief and a person not of his word — that’s you, Mr. Young,” Williams said.

    Williams, who ordered Young to comply with a long list of probation conditions that includes not having contact with the victims of the burglary and performing 500 hours of community service, reminded him what would happen if he violated any of those rules.

    “If you screw up, whether it’s me or another judge, they will not hesitate to send you to prison because you have proven yourself worthy,” Williams said. “Isn’t that sad? At age 16, you’ve proven yourself worthy of prison.”

    Between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Feb. 21, Young broke into a house on Portview Drive. In addition to a handgun, he stole about $120 in cash and collectible coins.

    It took police only a day to trace the burglary to Young, whose house they searched on Feb. 22. In addition to finding the stolen gun, cash and collector coins, officers found a laptop computer and accessories, video camera and GPS unit that were stolen from unlocked vehicles.

    Although Young was facing a maximum prison sentence of 15 years on the burglary conviction alone, Assistant District Attorney Jeff Sisley and Young’s lawyer, public defender Adrian Renner, argued that he should be placed on probation rather than sent to prison because of his age and the fact he didn’t contest the prosecution’s effort to waive him into adult court.

    Renner also pointed out that Young took responsibility for his crimes and sought a quick resolution to his cases.

    In a calm voice, Young told Williams, “I fully understand how horrible the crime I committed is. I understand I violated the security of this family. I understand they probably hate me, but I’m sorry for what I did.”

    Williams said she had considered a far more serious punishment for Young.

    “While Mr. Sisley wasn’t considering a prison sentence, I was,” she said. “You have no clue how important someone’s home is to them. You haven’t been a father doing whatever he can to protect his family.

    “There’s a saying that a man’s home is his castle. That’s the only place we can all retreat to ... and you violated that for this family.”

    According to the other conditions of Young’s probation, he must pay $1,341 in restitution and $1,240 in court costs, not possess, use or be around alcohol or non-prescribed drugs, undergo an alcohol and drug assessment and submit to random drug and alcohol tests.


 
Hwy. 33 work means traffic will move to outer lanes PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 02 May 2012 18:11

    Traffic along the Highway 33 reconstruction project will be moving in the next couple of weeks, Port Washington Public Works Director Rob Vanden Noven told the Common Council Tuesday.

    The stretch of highway between Tower and Portview drives in the city will be paved within the next two weeks. The road will remain closed while sidewalks are installed and landscaping done, he said, but it should be open by the end of May.

    “I want to push them to get it open for Memorial Day,” Vanden Noven said.

    Traffic along the bulk of the project will be moving to the outer lanes on either side of the median during the week of May 14, he added.

    That will allow crews to work on the medians and the center of the roadabouts, Vanden Noven said.

    Roundabouts will be constructed at Highway LL in Port Washington and Northwoods Road and Market Street in Saukville.

    Right now, he said, crews are working on the bike paths along Highway 33, the sidewalk along Highway LL and placing the light fixtures atop the poles in the medians.

    “We’re in for a traffic shift soon,” Vanden Noven said.

    Ald. Dan Becker questioned whether the Highway LL sidewalk north of Highway 33 will end abruptly without being linked to existing walkways.

    It is, and Becker said the city should now plan to link the path to an existing walkway so pedestrians aren’t stranded.

    “I totally agree,” Vanden Noven said. “It should be done.”

    But because of the terrain, the work will require engineering and a retaining wall will have to be built to extend the walkway to Aster Street.

    “It’s not going to happen this year,” Vanden Noven said.

 
More kudos for downtown Port PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 25 April 2012 18:45

State group gives awards for Baltica Tea Room work, creation of new website


    The renovations at Baltica Tea Room and Gift Shop and the website operated jointly by Port Washington Main Street, the Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Council received Main Street Awards from the Wisconsin Economic Development Corp. Friday.

    Also honored were Jill Kirst, Port Main Street’s volunteer of the year, and Marcia Endicott, board member of the year.

    Baltica Tea Room and its owners, Urzula Cholewinska and her husband Dan Micha, received the award for best interior renovation project.

    The project, which converted a dated jewelry store into a bright restaurant and shop, was honored for the attention to detail and the historic nature of the renovation, Main Street Director Sara Grover said.

    “They researched and researched the building, and they were very careful to observe the history of the building as they renovated it,” she said.

    The project also had a green aspect to it, she said, noting that the couple reused as many pieces of the original building as possible and also recycled items not used, such as the Vitrolite panels that were on the front facade.

    The renovation was originally nominated in another category, Grover noted, but the judges moved it to the interior renovation division to ensure the work got the recognition it deserved.

    “We’re so excited about it,” Cholewinska said. “It’s been a fun journey. When we bought the building in January 2011, we knew we had an 1854 Italianate-style building. We uncovered a lot of architectural details and clues to its history. “

    The clues included the original tin ceiling, which had been hidden under a false ceiling, and old paneling that was used as inspiration for similar panels in the front and back of the shop, Cholewinska said.

    “We had a great vision for it, and we had a great crew who supported it,” she said including architect Vince Micha, contractor John Sauermilch Jr., Joe Lawniczak  of the Wisconsin Main Street program, Port Main Street and the City of Port.

    The couple’s decision to cover the facade while renovating the building also helped to build excitement about the project, Cholewinska said.

    “That created immense curiosity,” she said. “When we finally unveiled it, many people walked in in awe.”

    The excitement is continuing throughout downtown as more buildings are being occupied and renovated, Cholewinska added.

    “Getting involved in all that’s happening in Port Washington is a dream come true,” she said. “I think the excitement is building. We’ve talked to a lot of business owners, and they feel it too.”

    The website www.visitportwashington.com was lauded by the state in large part because it is a joint venture between Main Street, the Tourism Council and Chamber of Commerce, Grover said.

    “We are unique to the state,” Grover said. “We’ve worked together to provide all the information citizens and tourists want and need. We’ve done our homework to make sure it’s visible and people are able to use it easily.”

    The site’s mobile app will be a significant asset for tourism, she said, noting many visitors are not planning ahead but instead stopping in communities on the spur of the moment.

    “The app gives them a constant source of information,” Grover said, as will the QR code to scan.

    “This really portrays Port Washington as a destination.”

    Tourism Executive Director Kathy Tank concurred, adding that the site provides information not only for visitors but for people who are looking for a location to open a business, businesspeople who want to network and residents in need of services.

    It is especially gratifying to know the state organization will use Port’s site as an example of community collaboration, Tank said.

    Kirst was recognized for the many roles she has played with Main Street since it was formed in 2008, Grover said, especially as volunteer coordinator for Maritime Heritage Festival.

    Endicott has worked on a number of initiatives, including the BIZ breakfasts and is chairing a masquerade ball planned for fall.


Image Information: BALTICA TEA ROOM in Port Washington and its owners, Urzula Cholewinska and her husband Dan Micha, received an award for the best interior renovation project by the Wisconsin Economic Development Corp last week. The couple’s son Jakub, who stood next to his mother, showed off the award Tuesday. The project was nominated for the award by Port Washington Main Street.       Photo by Sam Arendt

 
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