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Port Washington


Summer school with a smile PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by BILL SCHANEN IV   
Wednesday, 29 June 2011 18:25

PW-S program keeps students coming back, this year 1,100 strong

The two-week break from classes is over for the more than 1,100 children who returned to school Monday.

TUESDAY WAS JUST another tough day in class for Ryan Umhoefer and the other students in the Port-Washington-Saukville School District summer school fishing class. After organizing their gear, the students went outside to practice casting. They planned to fish in the Port harbor Wednesday.
                                       Photo by Sam Arendt
But this isn’t school in the conventional sense. This is Port Washington-Saukville School District summer school, where more than half the students in the district flock to Thomas Jefferson Middle School and Lincoln Elementary School every morning with smiles on their faces and fishing poles and musical instruments in their hands.

“What a tremendous sight it is to see all these students coming to school with smiles on their faces,” said Arlan Galarowicz, middle school principal and summer school coordinator. “Summer school is just a riot. I’d do it until I was 90 if they’d let me.”

One of the largest programs of its type in the state, the five-week Port-Saukville summer school is a massive undertaking that offers more than 80 courses ranging from classes that reinforce core subjects such as reading and math to enrichment offerings that range from fishing, gardening and band to knitting and cooking.

A staff of about 100 educators and helpers is hired to teach the courses, and a legion of older students are enlisted to guide children, some as young as 7, from class to class.

“We’ve been told we have one of the best summer programs in the country,” Galarowicz said. “I’d like to see one better.”

Nineteen years ago, Galarowicz inherited summer school from former middle school principal Joe Groh, whom he credits with laying the groundwork for the successful program. Since then, summer school has more than doubled in size in terms of both enrollment and class offerings.

It has become the thing for children to do in summer. Galarowicz calls it one part of an ideal summer schedule that gives kids a structured, productive start to their day and allows for plenty of free time in the afternoon. Classes run from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

“A lot of kids go to summer school, but what concerns me are the parents who say their kids don’t go because they sleep until noon,” Galarowicz said. “We can’t let our children sleep half their lives away, and what more powerful way to motivate kids than summer school.”

The courses may be varied, but they all are designed to teach, not merely to kill time. The benefits of extra help in subjects like math and reading are obvious, but even classes like fishing, gardening and knitting teach important life lessons, Galarowicz said.

Among some of the recently added classes are algebra readiness, card-making, Career Pathways, which teaches children about the education and training required for various jobs, Fitness and Healthy Eating, digital photography, Sewing and Design, weaving, engineering and Next Generation Math, a program that uses computer-based learning methods that Galarowicz hopes to use during the regular school year.

One of the recent success stories is gardening, a class that began with a relatively small number of students last year and was expanded this year because of its popularity. Administrators had to cut off enrollment at 100 students this summer.

Children in the class are in charge of planting and maintaining a large garden at the Harbor Campus senior living facility in Port Washington, then harvesting bushels of vegetables that they also learn how to cook.

“It teaches kids that food really doesn’t grow on the grocery store shelves,” Galarowicz said.

“Summer school classes prepare kids for the lives ahead of them in so many ways.”

 
Irked by weeds, officials to crack down on unkempt lawns PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 22 June 2011 17:49

Port Common Council considers ordinance that lowers maximum grass height, give scofflaws less time to comply

Port Washington officials on Tuesday took the first step to crack down on people who don’t care for their lawns.   

Aldermen reviewed a proposed six-page ordinance on the control of weeds, grasses, lawns and natural lawns that is intended to help keep neighborhoods looking neat and keep nuisances to a minimum.

The proposed ordinance was sought by the council after Mayor Scott Huebner and some residents complained about the number of unkempt lawns in the city.

One resident decried the fact that developers often prepare lots but, when they don’t sell, allow the grass to grow unchecked and weeds to take over. As the weeds go to
seed, they spread to neighboring properties.

In recent years, Huebner said, the number of people neglecting their yards has increased substantially, especially as foreclosures have increased. That’s because the banks that end up with title to the properties are less motivated to maintain them regularly than homeowners, he said.

The current law, which allows grass and weeds to reach 12 inches before the city can step in, doesn’t prevent problems, Huebner said.

So far this year, the city has sent out 10 letters to property owners who have not kept up their lawns, according to the Department of Public Works. Of those, five lawns were cut by the city and the property owner charged for the work and four by the owner. The deadline for mowing has not been reached for the other property.

Last year, the city sent out 34 letters for unkempt lawns during the same time frame, according to department records. 

The ordinance reviewed Tuesday is based on laws in the cities of Cedarburg and Appleton and Village of Germantown, City Attorney Eric Eberhardt said.

“The key to this ordinance is to classify the acts you don’t want to see as a public nuisance,” he said. “The ordinance makes it clear, it’s a duty to regularly mow.”

One of the keys to the ordinance, he said, is that lawns must be kept 8 inches or shorter, as compared to the current ordinance, which sets the maximum height at 12 inches.

Once a property owner is notified by the city that the lawn is too high, he would have five days to contest that ruling or cut the lawn, Eberhardt said. The current ordinance gives owners 10 days to comply.

If the homeowner doesn’t cut the lawn, the city could then go in and do the work, Eberhardt said. Not only would the city be able to charge for the cost of labor and equipment, inspection and administrative fees could also be charged.

“All of this is to gain compliance, but there’s a bit of a punitive aspect to it as well,” Eberhardt said, noting the hope is that it will deter property owners from becoming repeat offenders.

The proposed ordinance would require people with natural lawns to obtain a permit for them, Eberhardt said. To do so, property owners would need to present a plan for the lawn, including a list of the plants to be used and information on how it will be  maintained.

“They can keep these areas, but they must get a permit,” Eberhardt told aldermen. “Is that burdensome? Is that outrageous? That’s for you to decide.”

Ald. Jim Vollmar questioned how this would affect people who live along the bluff and ravine, noting many of them maintain their lawns but keep the hillsides natural.

Unless a permit is obtained for these areas, Eberhardt said, the homeowners would be in violation of the ordinance.

The proposed ordinance also prohibits planting anything but grasses in the parkway, but Ald. Paul Neumyer pointed out there are several property owners who have done extensive plantings in the parkways.

He asked if the existing plantings can be exempt so the property owners aren’t affected by the proposed ordinance.

“I know the properties you’re talking about, and they’re fantastic,” Eberhardt said. However, he said, the plantings would not be allowed under the ordinance, which is intended to be part of the building code.

If the city makes the ordinance part of the zoning code, he said, these could be allowed as nonconforming uses.

Ald. Joe Dean said the city should use common sense when applying the ordinance, using it when complaints are lodged rather than having workers write up any tall lawns they see.

“We’re not sending our weed commissioner out to inspect every property looking for a blade of grass taller than eight inches,” he said. “Are we going to be reasonable?”

But the ordinance’s length and complexity had some aldermen questioning it.

“The mayor was just looking for people to cut their grass,” Ald. Dan Becker said. “Are we getting a little too complicated?

“Maybe it can’t be that simple today. We’re dealing with foreclosures. And it’s affecting people in our community.”

Eberhardt said the city’s current ordinance is not only brief but lacking in many ways.

For example, he said, the existing ordinance refers to natural lawns but “there is nothing that would give you teeth to deal with them.”

“This is a far better ordinance than what’s on the books now,” he said. “I think it’s a good ordinance.”

Aldermen are expected to tweak the ordinance when they give it a final review on  Tuesday, July 19.

 
Town wants input on farmland preservation PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 15 June 2011 17:43

Feedback at Monday meeting will help Port board decideif it should change land-use plan to comply with county’s

Town of Port Washington officials are seeking input from residents to decide whether to amend the town’s land use plan to comply with Ozaukee County’s plan — a decision that will determine whether town residents can participate in the state’s
revised farmland preservation program.

The Town Board will hold a special meeting Monday that will include a farmland preservation presentation at about 8 p.m.

“We want to hear from the people this affects the most before we spend the money to amend our plan,” Town Chairman Jim Melichar said.

The town sent 36 letters out to landowners who have been involved in the farmland preservation program, he said, although it’s not known if all of these residents continue to participate in the program.

Unless the town amends its ordinances to match the county’s, landowners won’t be able to participate in the farmland preservation program, Melichar said.

At issue is the town’s conservation subdivision ordinance, Melichar said.

The town’s zoning ordinances include a formula allowing development on a sliding scale, with a minimum lot size of 3-1/2 acres, he said.

“We spent three to five years developing our formula,” Melichar said. “We put a lot of thought and effort into determining what’s best for the landowners in our town.”

No one has used the conservation subdivision ordinance yet, Melichar said, noting it took effect just as the housing market slowed.

The county and state’s new farmland preservation rules allow development on one acre of land for every 20 acres that’s preserved, he said.

The town must make a decision on the land use plan by the end of the year.

“We’ll see what the response is at the meeting Monday and go from there,” Melichar said.

The Town Board is also poised to award contracts for ditch mowing, the replacement of three culverts and surface paving on Willow Road — highway items that in other years would have been handled through the Ozaukee County Highway
Department, Melichar said.

Contractors have until Monday to submit bids for the work.

“From what I’ve heard, there are quite a few private contractors interested in the work,” Melichar said. “I’ve heard that private contractors are bidding at the break-even point just so they have work. We’ll see what happens.”

The town sought a cost estimate from the county for the work, he said.

“It went up quite a bit from last year,” Melichar said. “I thought it was a good time to look at it (private bids).”

By seeking bids, he and the Town Board are fulfilling an election promise to seek competitive bidding on highway work, he noted.

 
Redistricting may pit Port aldermen against each othe PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 08 June 2011 21:18

Proposal to realign wards places incumbents Neumyer, Babcock in same city district


A proposed redistricting plan for the City of Port Washington would place incumbent aldermen Paul Neumyer and Burt Babcock in the same district, forcing them to run against each other in the spring election if they seek another term on the Common Council.
The change was made as the city sought to align its aldermanic wards with Ozaukee County’s proposed supervisory districts, City Administrator Mark Grams said Tuesday during the Common Council’s initial review of the redistricting plan.

In attempting to keep the city wards within the county district boundaries and equalize the populations in each, the new 2nd District encompassed the homes of both Neumyer and Babcock, he said.

“There’s just no way to avoid it,” Grams said.

But that didn’t satisfy Neumyer.

“I object to this strongly,” he said. “Burt’s losing his district. How does this benefit the city?”

Ald. Joe Dean, who is also a county supervisor, said the object is not to retain seats for current officials.

“The intent of the county and the intent here should be that people are represented,” he said. “I don’t see anyone in the city or county who won’t be represented.”

Each of the proposed city aldermanic districts contains about 1,600 residents with one exception, District 4, which has 1,399 residents, Grams said.  However, that district encompasses the areas of highest growth, including the Greystone and Misty Ridge subdivisions, Grams said.

Since the federal census figures were released, 20 to 25 new homes have been built in that district, he noted.

The city is also contemplating changes to its voting locations as the redistricting is completed, Grams said.

Under consideration is a plan where voters in Districts 4, 5 and 6 would vote at Dunwiddie Elementary School, those in Districts 2 and 3 at City Hall and those in Districts 1 and 7 at Thomas Jefferson Middle School.

Currently, voters from Districts 2, 3 and 4 vote at City Hall.

The Common Council is expected to revisit the redistricting and approve a new aldermanic district map when it meets Tuesday, June 21.

The map would then go back to Ozaukee county for final approval.

 
City raises rates for ambulance service PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 08 June 2011 19:43

As the City of Port Washington prepares to upgrade its ambulance service to a paramedic unit, aldermen on Tuesday agreed to increase ambulance rates to help cover the cost.

The rate increase is the first for the service in four years, Fire Chief  Mark Mitchell told the Common Council Tuesday.

Mitchell said he hopes to find out next week whether the state has approved the city’s application to become a paramedic service.

The department is poised for that ruling, he said, noting that there are already four paramedics on the roster.

“Unfortunately they can’t use their paramedic skills until we’re certified (by the state),” Mitchell said.

Those four members will be supplemented by part-time paramedics once the state certifies the department as a paramedic service, he said.

The department expects to initially offer part-time paramedic coverage, increasing its service to full-time by the end of 2012.

“We’re very excited and ready to move ahead,” Mitchell said. “We’re going to get some real enhanced service with this.

“But it’s taken a little longer than I expected.”

The department was poised to begin offering paramedic services in January, but the state review process was not complete.

Currently, the Port Washington ambulance service is rated for emergency medical technician-intermediate — one step below paramedics.

If the paramedic program is approved, Port would become only the second department in the county with this level of service. Thiensville is the other.

Paramedics receive a significantly higher level of training that enables them to better assess patients, administer more medications and conduct procedures that EMTs cannot perform.

The Common Council’s action increased the basic ambulance rate from $350 to $525 for city residents and $400 to $600 for non-residents. The mileage charge for residents increased from $8.75 to $12.75, and for non-residents from $9 to $13.

It also increased the charges for two tiers of advanced life support care, basic and advanced on-scene care, administering oxygen and spinal immobilization.

 
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