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Port Washington


Tavern license request riles neighbors PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 08 August 2012 18:02

Port residents cite noise concerns but officials grant cabaret permit, saying concerns can be addressed if they arise

    Sundance tavern is the latest bar in Port Washington to receive city approval to serve food and beverages on an outdoor patio, where entertainment may also be provided.

    The Common Council on Tuesday voted, 6-1, to approve a cabaret license and a conditional use permit that will provide for these outdoor services in a fenced area on the southwest side of the tavern at 551 N. Wisconsin St.

    Only Ald. Jim Vollmar dissented, noting that several neighbors had expressed concern that the noise will be disruptive.

    While the permit allows the tavern to serve food and beverages and have music outside until 10 p.m., several neighbors asked that the patio be closed earlier.

    “The people and the noise and the music were all inside. Now you’re bringing the bar into the neighborhood,” said Karina Gross, 553 N. Harrison St. “We’re hearing the foul language. We’re having people walk through our yards.

    “Why does this have to be in a residential neighborhood? There are plenty of empty storefronts in downtown.”

    She and her husband Link told aldermen they have no problem allowing diners outside on the patio, but Mr. Gross said he  preferred not having alcoholic beverages served or music played there.

    There are enough problems having a tavern in the neighborhood, he said, and these could be exacerbated with the outdoor area.

    Kyle Knop, 507 Catulpa St., told aldermen that since the statewide ban on smoking in taverns, more people have been congregating outside the bar and that’s when problems have occurred.

    “It’s when people are outside and they’re cursing, vulgarities are being thrown about,” he said.

    Randy Tetzlaff, the city’s director of planning and development, said the intent of the bar owners is to serve food and beverages and offer “music on the green,” relatively soft music, primarily during the day.

    The conditional use permit is identical to those issued to other city taverns and restaurants when they have opened outdoor areas, he noted.

    If problems arise, the council has the authority to revoke the permit or add more restrictions, Tetzlaff added.

    “We’re trying to be as careful as we can. We don’t want any problems up there,” said Lila Parent, who with Pat Montalto owns the tavern. “We certainly don’t intend to have a wild band out there. I understand there are young families living around our building.”

    But, she added, the bar has been in the neighborhood since the 1860s, and neighbors knew it was there when they moved in.

    Ald. Paul Neumyer noted that there have been few complaints filed with the police department.

    “It’s very hard to limit something if we don’t have a record of problems,” he said.

    Many of the neighbors’ comments are about problems happening now and can’t be attributed to the patio, Ald. Dave Larson said. They should be dealt with on their own, not as if they are being caused by the outdoor area.

    Although aldermen initially considered limiting the music to acoustic offerings, they eliminated that restriction.

    “I don’t think that’s fair,” Ald. Dan Becker said. “We haven’t done any restrictions on any one of the permits we’ve approved. I think we should keep everybody on the same playing field. Let’s see what happens.”

   

 
Driver charged in downtown Port hit and run PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by BILL SCHANEN IV   
Wednesday, 01 August 2012 17:16

Saukville man, 20, also accused of hiding drugs in car

    A 20-year-old driver has been charged with hitting a pedestrian in downtown Port Washington, then speeding away from the scene of the accident.

    Michael R. Frey of Saukville faces one felony count of hit and run causing injury in connection with the accident, which occurred at 1:30 a.m. Sunday, July 22, just hours after Port’s Fish Day celebration ended.

    That was the only crime Frey was charged with until police, who received an anonymous tip days later, discovered a secret compartment in his Honda Accord. In it, they found two types of prescription drugs — the narcotic pain reliever oxycodone and suboxone, which is used to treat drug dependencies, according to the criminal complaint charging Frey with one felony count of possession of narcotic drugs and one misdemeanor count of possession of a controlled substance.

    Frey’s trouble began when he hit a pedestrian near the 100 block of North Franklin Street, according to the criminal complaint filed in Ozaukee County Circuit Court.

    Two police officers and a reserve officer were nearby at the time and witnesses said the pedestrian, who was not in a crosswalk, either walked or ran in front of Frey’s car, Police Chief Kevin Hingiss said last week.

    “It was not the driver’s fault,” Hingiss said. “The problem is he drove off after it happened.”

    Frey sped off, weaving through downtown and past squad cars before turning onto Lake Street. He was headed toward Upper Lake Park when officers stopped him, the complaint states.

    Field sobriety tests indicated Frey, who said he didn’t see the pedestrian until he hit him, was not drunk or otherwise impaired, according to the complaint.

    Frey told police he fled the scene because he panicked, the complaint states.

    The pedestrian, Christopher Morano, 22, of Port Washington, was taken by ambulance to Froedtert Hospital in Wauwatosa, police said.

    After Frey was released from custody, he asked police and the Ozaukee County District Attorney’s Office for permission to remove items from his car, which was impounded, the complaint states.

    Randy Lanser of Lanser Garage and Towing in Belgium, which towed the car after the accident, also reported that Frey tried to access his car.

    Police then received two tips that Frey hid drugs in a secret compartment under the shifter in his car. Police found 33 oxycodone tablets and suboxone films in the vehicle, according to the complaint.

    Frey told police he wasn’t a drug dealer but had a “problem” that he treated with suboxone, the complaint states.

    Frey is free in lieu of $500 bail, according to court records.

        
   

 
Coal dock park work to begin in fall PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 18:25

South end of lakefront land will open to public soon, but north end won’t be accessible until next June  

  The south coal dock will open to the public in the coming weeks, Port Washington officials said Tuesday, but the bulk of the dock won’t be accessible until next June.

    Although the city had hoped to get infrastructure work on the north dock under way earlier this year, plan revisions needed to meet state requirements meant construction was delayed, Public Works Director Rob Vanden Noven said last week.

    Design work is being completed for the walking paths, promenade, parking areas, access road and a bridge that will connect the north and south portions of the former coal dock, he said.

    “We’re building essentially the body of the park,” he said.

    However, there’s more to the project than the work on the north dock.

    Work to naturalize the bank of Sauk Creek is expected to be completed this fall, Vanden Noven said.

    A bird sanctuary built by We Energies on the south dock is expected to open Aug. 6, Vanden Noven said. At that point, people will be able to walk from the south beach through the south dock to the intake channel.

    Vanden Noven told the Coal Dock Committee Tuesday that he hopes to obtain bids for the north dock work in August. The Common Council could then award the bids in September, with construction beginning in October.

    “Because there are no residents in the area, the contractor can work on and off throughout the winter,” Vanden Noven said.

    In spring, city crews will build an elevated boardwalk along the east end of the north dock, he added.

    The boardwalk will extend off the 1,000-foot promenade that will run along the north end of the property adjacent to the west slip. There will be no railing along the 18-foot-wide promenade to allow maximum flexibility for boats docking next to the dock, Vanden Noven said.

    Five pedestals with low-light fixtures are expected to be installed on the promenade to service as many as 10 ships, he said.

    The city now needs to consider what the park will be used for and the amenities that should be added, Vanden Noven said.

    The park’s master plan called for everything from a water feature to an interactive children’s garden to a community center.

    There is plenty of space for events and amenities, Vanden Noven said, noting that Rotary Park, where several festivals are held, is one acre while the coal dock is 13 acres.

    A public meeting to garner input on the future amenities is scheduled for 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2.

    Mayor Tom Mlada, a member of the committee, suggested the first event should be relatively modest, perhaps something that will draw a few hundred participants rather than a large festival.

    Others suggested the first event could be a grand opening for the park.

    To help fund the future park development, Mlada said, the city should look into public-private partnerships.

    A number of businesses and community groups have expressed interest in that, said committee member Sara Grover, executive director of Port Washington Main Street.  

    The committee also agreed the park should be called Coal Dock Park, which has been the working title for it.

    Committee member Randy Tetzlaff, the city’s director of planning and development, said, “People know where the coal dock is, just like they know where Upper Lake Park is. It’s a destination.”

    The name could be amended in the future, members agreed.

    The city also needs to emphasize the connection between the dock and the downtown, committee members agreed.

    “The harborwalk (which runs from the north beach to Fisherman’s Park and will eventually connect with the coal dock) feels like a long, out-of-the way journey,” said committee member Bob Mittnacht, who said the city should emphasize the park’s connection to Wisconsin Street.

    The walk shouldn’t be too intimidating,  especially for a city that prides itself on being pedestrian-friendly, Vanden Noven said, noting the distance from Veterans Park to the dock is the same as walking from Summerfest’s north gate to the main stage.

    “Once the entry to the park gets more inviting, people won’t think about how long the walk is,” said committee member Kathy Tank, the city’s director of tourism. “They’re going to want to get there.”

 
Lack of funds curtails city’s bluff study PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 18 July 2012 17:41

Without money for soil borings, Port aldermen table next step in battling erosion problem

    Port Washington aldermen on Tuesday decided to delay action on a proposal to conduct soil borings on the north bluff, saying they don’t have the needed funds to do the work right now.

    Although officials had talked about taking the money from the contingency fund, City Administrator Mark Grams said that would wipe out the fund with almost half the year to go.

    He suggested the city delay the work until later in the year so officials have a better idea if there will be enough surplus funds to pay for the project or until it can be included in the 2013 budget.

    “How long are the bids good for?” he asked.

    Delaying the project will also give the city a chance to see how well the recently installed curbs hold back runoff from the bluff, Grams said. “Let’s take the opportunity to see where we are,” he said.

    The city received two proposals for the boring project, Public Works Director Rob Vanden Noven said, adding he did not know how long the low estimate of $14,880 from Giles Engineering would be valid.

    The project would include two soil borings to a depth of about 110 feet, Vanden Noven said, and installing piezometers to determine the levels of groundwater in the bluff. The results would be analyzed by the firm, which would also make recommendations on various stabilization measures, such as installing drain wicks and cutting back the bluff.

    Ald. Jim Vollmar, who has pushed the city to look into bluff stabilization measures, said it may be prudent to delay the project.

    “I think we’d all like to have this done, but if there’s no money to do it maybe it would be better to hold it over,” he said.

    Aldermen directed Vanden Noven to see how long Giles would honor its price, and said they would address the matter again at the council’s Aug. 7 meeting.

    But several aldermen said the city needs to continue to look at the issue of bluff stabilization.

    “Our bluff is very important to us for myriad reasons,” Ald. Dan Becker said.

    Ald. Joe Dean said the city needs to look at the big picture, adding the issue is a perfect one for the newly formed Environmental Planning Committee to tackle.

    “I can’t imagine a higher priority for them,” he said. “I think the timing is right.”

    The discussion, he said, could include not only what the city can do long and short-term but also ways to pay for it, including public-private partnerships.

    The Ozaukee Washington Land Trust is interested in working with the city on the project, Dean added.

    The slumping bluff has plagued the city and beach-goers for decades. In the 1980s and 90s, it wasn’t uncommon for large portions of the bluff to collapse.

    In April 1993, a huge mudslide took hundreds of thousands of pounds of earth down the side of the bluff and completely across the beach, leaving a mound of clay-like earth roughly 12 feet high.

    Bluff stabilization was a popular topic for years. In 2001, the city commissioned a bluff study by JJR, a firm that specializes in waterfront projects.

    The controversial plan proposed by the group called for cutting back the bluff significantly, as well as constructing breakwaters and revetments to protect the base of the bluff at a cost of $4.3 million.

    The plan was doomed not just because of the high pricetag but also because many people feared it would require trimming the size of Upper Lake Park too much and destroy the beach below.


 
Police lauded for saving man from fire PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 11 July 2012 18:25

Port officers praised after running into burning house to rescue sleeping resident

    Port Washington Police Officer Jerry Nye and Reserve Officer Michael Kolbach are being hailed as heroes for running into a burning house and rescuing a 21-year-old man who was sleeping in the basement early Sunday morning.

    “I almost want to deputize you for your efforts,” Fire Chief Mark Mitchell told the officers during Monday’s Police and Fire Commission meeting. “It’s huge to see that kind of bravery.”

    The man, Justin Kriegel, and his English springer spaniel Chelsea were rescued from the house at 230 Douglas St., but the family cat, Valley, didn’t survive, homeowner Tim Benson said Tuesday.

    “The police officers and fire department guys are all awesome,” Benson said.  “What we lost are material things. Everyone’s safe. We’re all doing well right now.”

    Benson also called his neighbor Carol Beck a hero.

    It was Beck who first saw sparks coming from the house about 1:35 a.m. Sunday and called police, Mitchell said. Nye and Kolbach arrived on the scene minutes later.

    “They just started pounding on the door,” Police Chief Kevin Hingiss said. “They yelled and pounded and the door popped open.”

    The officers searched the first floor, then found their way to the basement, where Kriegel was sleeping in a recreation room. They helped Kriegel, who walks with a cane, out of the house, stopping to grab the dog along the way, Hingiss said.

    Once outside, Kriegel told the officers the family cat was inside the house, but the smoke was so thick they couldn’t get back to search for the pet, he said.

    “When they went in, the smoke wasn’t bad, but when they left, it was pretty bad,” Mitchell said. “Without any concern for their own safety, they (the officers) entered the home. An initial negative search and increasing smoke conditions would have forced most people out of the building. Not so with officers Nye and Kolbach.

    “In my opinion, if it were not for the heroic act by officers Nye and Kolbach, the subject they rescued would have most surely suffered severe, if not fatal, injuries.”

    Mitchell, who arrived at the scene a few minutes after the officers, said the breezeway of the house was fully involved and the blaze was working its way into the garage and up a wall to the second floor of the house.

    Because of the heat, Mitchell said, he immediately called the Saukville and Grafton fire departments to the scene and asked Belgium to cover for Port at the fire station.

    The bulk of the fire was out within five minutes, he said, but due to the amount of cleanup work after he called for additional help from the Fredonia, Cedarburg and Belgium departments. The Waubeka and Thiensville departments stood by at the fire house.

    The Port department was at the scene until about 5:10 a.m., Mitchell said.

    Benson said he and his fiance Tina Kriegel, Justin’s mother, had gone out to dinner Saturday night and were shooting pool at Sundance when a police officer arrived at the bar.

    “He said, ‘Your house is on fire,’” Benson said. They ran out the door and hurried home, but he said their hearts sank as they turned the corner onto Douglas Street.

    “As soon as we turned the corner we could see it,” he said. “The flames were like 30 feet in the air.”

    Their first thoughts were for Justin, Benson said, adding they were relieved to find him unharmed.

    Benson’s 15-year-old son Kyle, who also lives in the home, was in northern Wisconsin at the time, he said.

    After the fire was extinguished, firefighters took Benson through the house.

    “That was hard,” he said, noting he has lived in the home for about 17 years, and built much of the cabinetry inside.

    The couple was able to salvage some clothing, a number of pictures and Tina’s great-grandmother’s china, he said.

    But the house is likely a complete loss, Benson said. Insurance officials estimate it will be at least November before the house is rebuilt and the family can move back in.

    The reality of what happened is still sinking in, Benson said.

    “You don’t know how much you have until you have nothing,” he said, laughing as he talked about how the family purchased a few groceries but then realized they had no knife with which to cut the cheese they bought.


    The family is staying at the Baymont hotel in Grafton while seeking an apartment to live in until the house is rebuilt, Benson said.

    Mitchell said firefighters believe the blaze started in the breezeway. The cause, he said, was likely electrical.

    But Benson said the insurance company’s inspectors told him the fire probably started on the deck and worked its way into the breezeway. The cause, he said, is unknown.

    There were smoke detectors in the house, but Mitchell said they were not going off when firefighters and police arrived.

    That surprised Benson, who said there was one in a first-floor hallway and one in the basement. The smoke hadn’t gotten downstairs when police arrived, he noted.

    “I can’t believe that one (on the first floor) wouldn’t go off,” he said. “Believe me, my next house, when it’s done, is going to have smoke detectors all over.”


PORT WASHINGTON POLICE Reserve Officer Michael Kolbach (left) and Officer Jerry Nye are being hailed as heroes for rescuing a 21-year-old man from a burning house on Douglas Street early Sunday morning. The house and attached garage were largely destroyed in the fire.    Photo by Sam Arendt


 
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