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More kudos for downtown Port PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 25 April 2012 18:45

State group gives awards for Baltica Tea Room work, creation of new website


    The renovations at Baltica Tea Room and Gift Shop and the website operated jointly by Port Washington Main Street, the Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Council received Main Street Awards from the Wisconsin Economic Development Corp. Friday.

    Also honored were Jill Kirst, Port Main Street’s volunteer of the year, and Marcia Endicott, board member of the year.

    Baltica Tea Room and its owners, Urzula Cholewinska and her husband Dan Micha, received the award for best interior renovation project.

    The project, which converted a dated jewelry store into a bright restaurant and shop, was honored for the attention to detail and the historic nature of the renovation, Main Street Director Sara Grover said.

    “They researched and researched the building, and they were very careful to observe the history of the building as they renovated it,” she said.

    The project also had a green aspect to it, she said, noting that the couple reused as many pieces of the original building as possible and also recycled items not used, such as the Vitrolite panels that were on the front facade.

    The renovation was originally nominated in another category, Grover noted, but the judges moved it to the interior renovation division to ensure the work got the recognition it deserved.

    “We’re so excited about it,” Cholewinska said. “It’s been a fun journey. When we bought the building in January 2011, we knew we had an 1854 Italianate-style building. We uncovered a lot of architectural details and clues to its history. “

    The clues included the original tin ceiling, which had been hidden under a false ceiling, and old paneling that was used as inspiration for similar panels in the front and back of the shop, Cholewinska said.

    “We had a great vision for it, and we had a great crew who supported it,” she said including architect Vince Micha, contractor John Sauermilch Jr., Joe Lawniczak  of the Wisconsin Main Street program, Port Main Street and the City of Port.

    The couple’s decision to cover the facade while renovating the building also helped to build excitement about the project, Cholewinska said.

    “That created immense curiosity,” she said. “When we finally unveiled it, many people walked in in awe.”

    The excitement is continuing throughout downtown as more buildings are being occupied and renovated, Cholewinska added.

    “Getting involved in all that’s happening in Port Washington is a dream come true,” she said. “I think the excitement is building. We’ve talked to a lot of business owners, and they feel it too.”

    The website www.visitportwashington.com was lauded by the state in large part because it is a joint venture between Main Street, the Tourism Council and Chamber of Commerce, Grover said.

    “We are unique to the state,” Grover said. “We’ve worked together to provide all the information citizens and tourists want and need. We’ve done our homework to make sure it’s visible and people are able to use it easily.”

    The site’s mobile app will be a significant asset for tourism, she said, noting many visitors are not planning ahead but instead stopping in communities on the spur of the moment.

    “The app gives them a constant source of information,” Grover said, as will the QR code to scan.

    “This really portrays Port Washington as a destination.”

    Tourism Executive Director Kathy Tank concurred, adding that the site provides information not only for visitors but for people who are looking for a location to open a business, businesspeople who want to network and residents in need of services.

    It is especially gratifying to know the state organization will use Port’s site as an example of community collaboration, Tank said.

    Kirst was recognized for the many roles she has played with Main Street since it was formed in 2008, Grover said, especially as volunteer coordinator for Maritime Heritage Festival.

    Endicott has worked on a number of initiatives, including the BIZ breakfasts and is chairing a masquerade ball planned for fall.


Image Information: BALTICA TEA ROOM in Port Washington and its owners, Urzula Cholewinska and her husband Dan Micha, received an award for the best interior renovation project by the Wisconsin Economic Development Corp last week. The couple’s son Jakub, who stood next to his mother, showed off the award Tuesday. The project was nominated for the award by Port Washington Main Street.       Photo by Sam Arendt

 
Harley event could bring 20,000 riders to Port in 2013 PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 18 April 2012 18:36

Main Street plan for street festival held in conjunction with motorcycle maker’s anniversary bash endorsed by council


    Port Washington will be in hog heaven next year.

    City officials on Tuesday gave their approval to a plan by Port Washington Main Street and Suburban Harley-Davidson in Thiensville to host a street festival in conjunction with the iconic motorcycle-maker’s 110th anniversary celebration over Labor Day weekend 2013.

    The festival, which is tentatively scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 29, would be held at the beginning of the anniversary celebration, organizers said.

    It  would run from 3 to 11 p.m. and initial estimates are that it could draw as many as 20,000 people to downtown Port, Main Street Executive Director Sara Grover said.

    “This would be a massive undertaking,” Grover said. “We never take an event lightly.”

    Suburban officials will seek Harley-Davidson’s endorsement to see if the event could be designated as an official part of the anniversary celebration, said Amy Gannon, a member of the organizing committee. If the company endorses it, the festival would be listed on the official anniversary celebration tickets that will go out to roughly 500,000 riders, she said.

    Even if it isn’t endorsed by the corporation, it will still go on, organizers said.

    The one-time festival, which would be patterened after Main Street’s Community Street Festival, would be held on Franklin Street and Grand Avenue, stretching from the foot of St. Mary’s Hill to the corner of Wisconsin and Franklin streets next to City Hall. Among the attractions would be music, a variety of vendors from within the city and outside the community and fireworks.

    Local businesses would be encouraged to stay open until 10 p.m. that day.

    “There are a lot of great ideas right now,” said Cathy Wilger, a member of the organizing committee. “The excitement seems to be growing as more and more people find out about this.”

    Funding for the festival would come largely through sponsorships and in-kind donations, the organizers said. Grover said she will also seek a grant to help defray expenses.

    Ald. Jim Vollmar said that, although he likes the idea of the festival, he is worried that the city may not attract many of the motorcycle riders. When Harley celebrated its centennial, the city prepared for an influx of visitors but only a few showed up, he said.

    “I’m enthusiastic about this, but I’m concerned we might get ready for a big party and no one comes,” he said.

    Gannon noted that Suburban Harley is one of the state’s largest Harley-Davidson dealerships, and the company decided it wanted to host a celebration in Port. That support will help draw people to the city for the event, she said.

    “Everything we’re doing is to truly set us apart from the other block parties (being held by other dealerships in conjunction with the anniversary celebration),” Gannon said.

    Wilger also noted that Suburban Harley is talking about developing a lakefront motorcycle ride that would lead enthusiasts to Port Washington.

    City officials were enthusiastic about the idea.

    “Obviously we’re a tourist town. We like bringing people into our community. This is a unique event,” Ald. Dan Becker said. “I don’t see anything bad that can come of this.”

    Ald. Paul Neumyer, a retired Mequon police officer and current acting Thiensville police chief, said that when Suburban last hosted a party for Harley’s anniversary, everything went smoothly.

 
PW-S board closes book on $2.6 million referendum PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by BILL SCHANEN IV   
Wednesday, 11 April 2012 17:20

District makes final payment on maintenance work loan that changed school officials’ approach to borrowing


    Just nine years after winning voter approval to borrow $2.6 million, the Port Washington-Saukville School Board has repaid the loan and is free of referendum debt.

    The district made its last payment of $465,000 at the beginning of the month.

    “This is terrific,” Supt. Michael Weber said. “We have no referendum debt. There just aren’t many districts in this situation.

    “This is a milestone for me. In all the years I’ve been a superintendent (22), I’ve never been in a district that has made a final payment on its referendum debt until now.”

    The money was spent on a host of improvement projects throughout the district that included heating upgrades, a new Port Washington High School gym floor and a makeover of outdoor athletic facilities.

    “For what we were able to accomplish with $2.6 million, this was a good referendum,” Weber said.

    More than allowing the district to accomplish deferred maintenance projects, the referendum, and its failed predecessor, set the tone for the district for years to come.        In November 2002, voters rejected a more costly referendum proposal. Stunned but determined to fund a more austere improvement initiative, school officials turned to their constituents for guidance.

    “I remember walking through Harry’s (restaurant) and people saying, ‘OK, Patty, you asked for our input so you better sit down and talk with us for awhile,’” School Board President Patty Ruth said.

    Board member Myron Praeger said, “We actually run our district the way we do today because we asked the community what it thought and we listened.”

    Five months after the referendum defeat, voters approved a revised borrowing plan and officials vowed to change the way they did business.    

    First, a School Board wary of saddling the district with long-term debt decided to repay the $2.6 million in just nine years despite foreseeable financial challenges.

    “To take such a short term on this amount of money really shows the fiscal responsibility of the board,” Director of Business Services Jim Froemming said.

    Then the board made good on a pledge Weber announced prior to the second referendum vote by creating a budget line item for building and grounds maintenance so the district would not have to ask voters again for permission to borrow for routine upgrades.

    Today, the district has a $200,000 maintenance fund and is considering increasing it to $300,000.

    “Eventually, we may need to go to referendum to take care of expensive projects like the replacement of roofs, but that’s a lot different than going to referendum to fund yearly maintenance,” Weber said.

 
City may rework loan for Smith Bros. building PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 04 April 2012 18:53

    Port Washington aldermen were expected on Wednesday to consider revising the terms of a $125,000 revolving loan it gave Lighthouse Development to improve the Smith Bros. Marketplace building almost two years ago.

    The move is a concession to the fact that Lighthouse Development will have to do substantial work on the landmark downtown building before Duluth Trading Co. moves in, City Administrator Mark Grams said.

    “They need money upfront,” Grams said. “They’re making a lot of improvements to the building. I don’t know how many of the improvements they realized they would have to make to secure Duluth.”

    Grams said Tuesday that he would likely recommend that the loan be repaid through the proceeds of the downtown tax incremental financing district.

    “At least we’ll get our money back,” he said, adding that the loan will then probably be repaid in about 10 years instead of the roughly 20 years originally envisioned.

    The tax district is also an appropriate way to repay the loan because Duluth Trading Co.’s move will attract other businesses to downtown, increasing the value of the district, Grams said.

    “I’m guessing a year from now you’re going to see more businesses downtown,” he said.

    Already a number of other stores and businesses have contacted nearby building owners — including the owner of the former M&I Bank building just down the block from the Smith Bros. building — asking about vacant spaces, Grams said.

    “I’m surprised at the number of people who have come up to me and said they’re excited about Duluth coming. I didn’t realize how big they are.”

    The city initially made the revolving loan to Lighthouse so it could renovate the Smith Bros. building to accommodate Franklin Energy, which occupies the second floor of the structure.

    The money was to be used to buy equipment, fixtures and furnishings and help finance capital expenses, aldermen said at the time.

    Part of the goal in bringing Franklin Energy to downtown was to create additional traffic in the shopping district with the goal of attracting additional stores and offices, they noted.

    Lighthouse Development has been paying back the revolving loan, Grams said, noting the payments thus far have gone to pay interest. The interest rate on the loan is 1.625%.

    Aldermen gave conceptual approval to the idea of revising the loan following a closed session before Duluth Trading Co. announced plans to locate its second retail store in Port Washington.

    Grams said the Common Council isn’t necessarily setting a precedent by revising the terms of the loan or allowing TIF funds to be used to repay it, noting the fact Duluth Trading Co. will become a downtown anchor played a significant role in the council’s decision.

    “This is a big company coming into our town,” he said. “If it was a Ma and Pa restaurant, I don’t know if we would do anything.”

 
Council hopefuls square off on April 3 ballot PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 28 March 2012 18:34

Incumbent Larson faces Schwister in race for Port’s 6th District aldermanic seat


    Port Washington Ald. Dave Larson said he’s believes the city’s heading in the right direction, and he’s seeking a third term in office to help shepherd the community as it works to realize its potential.

    But newcomer Tim Schwister said he’s seen little improvements in the city’s 6th District, and he wants to lead the way toward these advancements.

    The men will vie for the chance to represent the city’s southwest side in the Tuesday, April 3 election.

    Schwister, 39, of 1414 Willow Dr., said there’s more unemployment in the district than elsewhere in the city, and he wants to work to draw industrial business and jobs to the community.  

    “I don’t think there’s enough of an effort to do that right now,” he said. “Several of our elected officials are too concentrated on downtown. People need a place to work, then they can shop downtown.”

    This city’s done a good job with the downtown, he said, creating a reasonable business environment there.

    The city should provide incentives to businesses to come to the community and fill the many vacant buildings here, Schwister added.

    By attracting jobs, he said, the city will also help the struggling housing market and enable people to realize their dream of owning a home.

    “I think we should do everything we can to make that dream a reality,” Schwister said.    

    Larson, 45, of 509 Summit Dr., said the city has a great opportunity to redefine downtown with the coming of Duluth Trading Co.

    “The city did some really great things to make that happen,” he said of the company’s decision to open a store downtown. “Now, we have an opportunity to solicit the businesses we want to see there rather than waiting for them to call.”

    The city should update the marketing study done by the Taurean group to see what businesses would complement the mix downtown, he said, then go after them.

    The city’s biggest role in downtown development, he said, is to create an environment in which it’s easy to do business. In the past, he said, the city’s been seen as an impediment, but that’s changing.

    As evidence, he pointed to the city’s support of plans to renovate the former M&I Bank building.

    Tied to the downtown is the lakefront, an area where Larson said the city has made leaps forward.

    The south beach “is fabulous,” he said, while the north beach is equally nice.

    “We’ve got good access to the north beach,” he said, especially since the staircase connecting it to Upper Lake Park was built. “The only thing the city could do, as technology advances, is reduce the footprint of the wastewater treatment plant.”

    The city’s making progress on developing the coal dock, Larson said, noting much of the funding for the infrastructure is coming from grants.

    But now, he said, the city has some decisions to make. It has to come up with some creative ways to tie the coal dock to downtown. To do that, Larson said, the city could create a team of people from government and the community to come up with creative options.

    The city should also consider updating its development plan for the coal dock, he said, perhaps looking at the potential of a shipwreck museum as considered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which is contemplating the creation of a maritime sanctuary off Port’s shore.

    “I think the NOAA concept would be great,” Larson said. “But we need to consider other ideas in case it doesn’t happen.

    “This (the coal dock) is a big deal. We want that to succeed. Some people are upset it’s taken so long, but I’d rather we take the time and do it right.”

    Schwister said additional environmental impact and seismic studies should be done before anything’s developed on the coal dock.

    “I would like to see something built on the coal dock, but I don’t think it’s time yet,” he said. “We don’t want to build something and have it crumble under our feet. We don’t know if it (the coal dock) is stable. It bothers me. We should get the information.”

    In terms of the lakefront, he said the city has a gem in the north beach but should work to improve access to the south beach and clean it.

    “It’s a very nice place to go, but it’s very inaccessible,” Schwister said. “I’d like to see if we could do something more with the south beach.”

    He said the city should petition lawmakers to fix the breakwater, even if it means heading to Washington, D.C., to speak to them directly. If that doesn’t work, the city should repair the structure, Schwister said.

    “It’s our responsibility to take care of our city,” he said. “If it’s a danger, which it is, we should be proactive.”

    Until it’s fixed, the city should consider restricting access to it during storms, Schwister added.

    Both Larson and Schwister said that there’s little for the city to do right  now about the hundreds of acres on the city’s south side annexed in 2000 by Brookfield developer Vincent Kuttemperoor, whose ambitious plans for a high-end, multi-use development are unlikely to be realized now that he has lost control of the land.

    “I say we should let it sit and wait (for developers to approach the city),” Larson said. “To spend too much time on that right now might be a waste of energy. If we paintourselves in a corner without hearing their ideas, we may miss out on something.”

    Schwister, who ran unsuccessfully for state Assembly last year, said he is seeking a seat on the Common Council to help make a difference in his district and the community.

    “I will be open, honest, forthcoming and always available,” he said.

    Larson noted that he and his family are involved in the community and in the downtown, where he and his wife work.

    “We have a personal interest in the development and growth of the city,” he said. “You’re going to get the best I have. The decisions I make affect every aspect of my life.”

 

Port redistricting has incumbents competing for same 2nd District post


    Voters in Port Washington’s 2nd District will have their choice of two incumbents on the April 3 ballot — Paul Neumyer and Burt Babcock.

    Neumyer, of 643 N. Milwaukee St., has represented the city’s 2nd District since 2007, while Babcock, 221 W. Main St., has represented the 4th District since 1998. They are vying against each other for a seat on the Common Council because a fluke in redistricting placed them in the same district.

    “It’s unfortunate we both got stuck running in the same district,” said Neumyer, 57. “Burt’s a nice man. His heart is in the right place. But I feel I know the residents of the 2nd District.”

    Babcock, called the situation “unusual,” but said competition is good for the city.

    “In a democracy, you should have more than one person running so people have a choice,” he said. “I feel I’ve done a good job for the 4th District.”

    He said he would like to work to do an equally good job for the 2nd District.

    Overall, Babcock said, his first priority for the city is development of the coal dock infrastructure.

    Full development will take time because of the high cost, and it will likely require public-private cooperation, Babcock said, adding a partnership with We Energies could create a demonstration project on energy conservation. He said he would also like to see a community center that incorporates a hall or private shops if it can be done legally.

    No matter how it’s done, it’s important that the coal dock be developed in a way that doesn’t require a significant amount of maintenance by the Parks and Recreation Department staff, which is already burdened, Babcock said.

    The city should take a look at its parks and determine if they are all needed, added Babcock, a member of the Parks and Recreation Board. If they aren’t, he said, the city should consider selling a few and using the profits to maintain the others.

    This will also help keep the city’s taxes down, increase the tax base and avoid layoffs and cuts in services, he said.

    “Thirty-six parks is probably more than we really need,” Babcock said.

    Neumyer said he understands people are frustrated because the coal dock hasn’t been opened yet, but said the city has a good, workable plan for the area that will be implemented.

    “It’s a good plan, and we have to build on it,” he said. “We may have to tweak it.”

    The city’s been fortunate to receive a number of large grants to help pay for the infrastructure, Neumyer said, but because of the cost of the full development it may take some time.

    One priority should be the construction of restrooms, which would also serve the south beach, Neumyer said.

    “That’s something we’re going to have to look at. It will make it a lot more user-friendly,” he said.

    The south beach is a gem, Neumyer said, and a tremendous asset along the lakefront. But the city needs to improve the entrance to the north beach, where the bluff regularly slumps and sends mounds of earth over the pathway leading to the sand.

    “We don’t know how to address it right now, but we need to look at it,” he said.

    Babcock said he would like to see the city be more active on the lakeshore, pushing for cruise ships to visit and for the community to stress efforts to preserve Lake Michigan.

    Neumyer said his top priority is to maintain the current level of services and infrastructure in the city even as the budget gets tighter.

    “We’re going to have to get creative,” he said. “We’re not catching up with our road repairs, and we have a lot of roads in need of some major repairs.”

    The city has to look at its industrial base and work to attract new industry, Neumyer said, while balancing that with commercial and residential development.

    Babcock agreed that the city needs to continue to market itself to industry.

    “We are a very nice place to live, have a talented workforce and we’ve lost a myriad of jobs,” he said. “With a concerted effort, hopefully we could change that.”

    Babcock said he would like to see the city consider a tax incremental financing district for the hundreds of acres that make up the former VK Homes land on the city’s south side.

    The city could set the tone for that area when it sells 40 acres of land it owns north of that property, Babcock said.

     Neumyer said the city needs to plan for the area before developers buy the land.

    “Do we want that in residential use? Do we want it in light industrial use, especially those areas near the industrial park?” he asked. “It may be time to revisit the plan. Developers can tell us what they want to do, but it has to be what the city wants. We need to decide where we’re going there.

    “Whatever we do, it has to be integrated with the city. It’s not going to be a stand-alone community. It’s part of the City of Port Washington.”

    Both men said the city has done a good job creating a positive environment for business to flourish in downtown.

    “It’s been a long, hard struggle but we’re seeing the light at the end of the tunnel,” Neumyer said. “Duluth Trading Co. is going to be a big shot in the arm for downtown. I’m hoping the restaurants and other businesses all benefit from that.”

    Babcock said the downtown will also benefit from the renovation of the former M&I Bank project, something he worked hard to ensure would happen.

    “To me, it makes no sense to tear the building down if it can be fixed and made useful again,” he said.



 
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