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City may charge festivals for overtime costs PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 30 October 2013 18:19

Port committee recommends new policy on services it says would add $10,000 in revenue to 2014 budget

    Festivals in Port Washington will be charged for any overtime costs incurred by city departments if a new policy recommended by the Finance and License Committee is adopted by the Common Council.

    The committee estimated this would add $10,000 in new revenue to the proposed $8.8 million 2014 budget.

    This is the second year the committee has sought an increase in the amount it receives for services provides to festivals. Last year, the panel proposed imposing a surcharge on beer sold at festivals to help make up for overtime paid to city employees — a proposal dropped after the city attorney said it was illegal.

    The committee talked about a number of ways to recoup some of the city’s costs, including charging for both straight-time and overtime costs, before settling on charging festivals only for overtime, City Administrator Mark Grams said.

    “I think people are starting to understand you can’t expect everything and anything from the city any more,” Grams said. “It’s just not going to happen.

    “We have limited resources. The people who directly benefit from those services are being asked to pay for these services.”

    Budgets are too tight for the city not to consider imposing such a fee, he said, adding that time spent working for these festivals could otherwise be spent doing other things.

    Grams said Fish Day will likely incur the greatest cost under the formula.

    Calculations by the police, street  and parks and recreation departments show that they incurred $10,761 in overtime costs for Fish Day.

    Maritime Heritage Festival incurred $196 in police overtime costs and Rock the Harbor, a one-time festival, $5,285 in police and parks and recreation department overtime. The two combined for a total of $209 in overtime costs from the street department

    While the recommendation was unanimously approved by the committee, Grams said there will likely be opposition from some of the festivals when the Common Council holds its annual budget hearing at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 19.

    The city’s proposed 2014 budget reflects an increase of 1.85%, from $8.64 million to $8.8 million.

    The tax levy is expected to increase 1.84%, from $4.8 million to $4.9 million.

    Although he does not have the city’s assessed valuation yet, Grams said he is estimating the tax rate will increase about five cents. That would make the rate about $5.80 per $1,000 assessed valuation, an increase of $10 for a house valued at $200,000.

    The budget is largely a status-quo one, he said, with few initiatives.

    The budget will allow the police department to convert several more vehicles to propane fuel, a process that began this year, but the associated cost savings probably won’t be realized for another year, Grams said.

    The city also reallocated the $25,000 it traditionally gave to Port Main Street Inc., placing it instead in the economic development fund.

    The city is also expected to purchase a new dump truck for the street department and an intercept vehicle for the ambulance service.

     The city is expected to borrow about $200,000 next year to help finance several projects, including repairs on the streets around Port Washington High School and on Milwaukee Street, sidewalk repairs and a new phone system, Grams said.

    “The telephone system here is antiquated,” he said, noting it was installed in the late 1990s. When it needed repairs several months ago, officials were told there were no parts available, Grams said.

    The city’s operating costs are expected to be lower with the new system, he added.


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