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Teens cited when police visit party PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 31 October 2012 18:48

When Port Washington police responded to a call about excessive noise in the 1000 block of South Spring Street shortly after 2 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 21, they discovered a teen party.

    The majority of the 17 youths there — all but one of them a teenager, and all of them under the legal drinking age — were cited for curfew violations and underage drinking, police said.

    One of the teens, an 18-year-old Port Washington man, was picked up on a warrant issued by the Saukville police.

    A 20-year-old Port man was cited for loud and unnecessary noise and providing alcohol to underage people, according to police. The police department also asked the district attorney’s office to charge him with possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia.

    About 11:30 p.m. Oct. 23, police received a call from a man who lives in the 700 block of Milwaukee Street who said a man was lurking behind a tree outside his home but fled when the homeowner approached him.badge

    The suspicious man was described as tall with short hair or a balding head wearing a blue sweatshirt and gray pants, police said.
    A Port Washington woman reported that at about 8:20 a.m. Oct. 22, she and her son were crossing Holden Street at Walters Street when they were almost struck by a vehicle.

    Police tracked down the driver, who said the pedestrians should have stopped at the corner to check for vehicles before they headed into the crosswalk, and they did not do so.

    A 31-year-old Newburg man reported that about 7:25 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27, he was standing in the 400 block of Franklin Street next to his vehicle when a passing vehicle struck him in the elbow and left the scene.

    A hit-and-run accident at the roundabout at highways 33 and LL was reported at 9:30 a.m. Oct. 22.

    A vehicle driven by a West Bend man was traveling through the roundabout when a second vehicle entered without yielding, striking the West Bend man’s car.

 
Saukville cocaine dealer sentenced to 10 years in prison PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by BILL SCHANEN IV   
Wednesday, 31 October 2012 18:45

    A 40-year-old Saukville man with a criminal past was sentenced to 10 years in prison Tuesday for selling cocaine and possessing a gun.

    Frederick Baker, who pleaded guilty to felony counts of manufacturing/delivering cocaine, possession with intent to deliver cocaine and being a felon in possession of a firearm, was also sentenced to five years extended supervision.

    Ozaukee County Circuit Judge Paul Malloy chose the middle ground between a sentencing recommendation from the writer of a presentence report that Malloy said was too lenient and one from the district attorney’s office that he said was too harsh.

    Assistant District Attorney Jeffrey Sisley argued for a 15-year prison sentence followed by 15 years extended supervision and probation.

    The presentence report recommended a four to five-year prison sentence followed by three to four years of extended supervision.

    Before sentencing Baker, Malloy questioned Sisley about an “inference” in the state’s case that Baker was a relatively powerful, mid-level drug dealer.

    “It seems the meat is missing from the bones when it comes to this inference,” Malloy said. “How did the (drug unit) arrive at that conclusion?”

    Sisley said that the characterization of Baker was based on reports drug-unit officers received from their sources.

    “If I had evidence that Mr. Baker was a larger-scale drug dealer, I’d be more inclined to agree with the state’s recommendation, but I think it’s speculative and I can’t sentence someone based on speculation,” Malloy said.

    According to the criminal complaint, Baker was arrested after selling $1,300 worth of cocaine to undercover officers on five occasions in April.

    When authorities searched his home in the 600 block of North Dries Street, they found cocaine packaged for resale, marijuana and a loaded .45-caliber handgun, the complaint states.    

     Baker told authorities he regularly bought cocaine in Milwaukee and sold it in the Saukville area to pay bills, according to the complaint.

    According to court records, Baker was convicted of one felony count of possession with intent to deliver marijuana in Milwaukee County in 1994.

    “This is a man who needs to go to prison,” Sisley said during Tuesday’s sentencing hearing.

    Referring to the presentence report’s sentencing recommendation, he said, “The state doesn’t believe that’s sufficient. The message needs to be sent that if you decide you are going to sell cocaine in this community, you should go to prison for a long time.”

    Baker told Malloy he is a good person, the father of a 15-year-old daughter and a talented chef who made bad decisions following the breakup of his marriage.

    “I’m very good at what I do and plan to become an executive chef,” he said. “I have employers just waiting for me.”

    Malloy gave Baker credit for his stable work history but said he couldn’t overlook the seriousness of selling drugs.

    “We have a huge problem in this community involving controlled substances and it’s increasing,” he said. “It’s not just cocaine. Heroin and pain medications are flooding this community.

    “The disturbing thing is the drug dealer never gives a rip where his drugs end up. If they end up in the hands of a 15-year-old, that’s not his problem.”

 

   

 
Election officials poised for big turnout PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 31 October 2012 18:41

Port poll workers expect long lines Tuesday despite steady stream of City Hall visitors for early voting

    Port Washington officials are gearing up for a busy election  day Tuesday, despite the fact more voters than usual are casting their ballots early.

    “I guess people are afraid of long lines on election day,” City Clerk Mark Grams said when asked why so many residents are voting early.

    With so many people voting early and registering ahead of time, the lines may not be too bad, he said.

    “There are always lines first thing in the morning and about 4:30 p.m., but the rest of the day it’s just pretty steady,” Grams said.

    Since early voting began Oct. 22, there has seldom been a time when there hasn’t been someone casting a ballot at City Hall, Deputy City Clerk Susan Westerbeke said.

    “We’ve had lines on and off,” she said.vote
    On Oct. 22 alone, 172 people came to City Hall to vote, Westerbeke said, and since then, more than 100 people a day have voted daily.

    By Tuesday, 1,275 people had received absentee ballots or voted early, she said.

    “If it gets as busy as I expect in the next couple days, we may hit 2,000 (early voters),” Westerbeke said, noting the city has about 8,000 registered voters.

    During the last presidential election, she said, between 1,600 and 1,700 absentee ballots were cast in the city.

    A number of people have also stopped at City Hall to register during the last week, she said.

    “More (people are registering) than I anticipated after the recall election,” Westerbeke said, adding many are residents who have moved within the city.

    In the Town of Port Washington, Clerk Jenny Schlenvogt is holding extra office hours to accommodate early voters and people who need to register.

    In addition to her regular hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, Town Hall will be open from 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, and 2 to 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2.

    Polls open throughout the county at 7 a.m. and close at 8 p.m.

    At the top of the ballot will be the presidential election.

    While most people are expected to vote for Democratic President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden or their Republican challengers, Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan, there are other candidates.

    They include Constitution candidates Virgil Goode and Jim Clymer, Libertarians Gary Johnson and James Gray, Green Party candidates Jill Stein and Ben Manski, Socialist Equality Party candidates Jerry White and Phyllis Scherrer and Party of Socialism and Liberation candidates Gloria La Riva and Filberto Famirez, Jr.

    Also expected to bring people out are the U.S. Senate race between Republican Tommy Thompson and Democrat Tammy Baldwin, and the race between Republican Tom Petri and Democrat Joe Kallas for the 6th Congressional District seat.

    Highly contested races between incumbent Glenn Grothman, a Republican, and challenger Tanya Lohr, a Democrat, for the 20th District State Senate seat and, in the south end of the county, between incumbent Jim Ott, a Republican, and Democratic challenger Cris Rogers for the 23rd District Assembly seat are also expected to draw voters to the polls.

    A smattering of uncontested races — among them Adam Gerol for district attorney, Julie Winkelhorst for county clerk, Karen Makoutz for county treasurer and Ronald Voigt for register of deeds — will also be on the ballot.

     Grams predicted that voting on Tuesday, Nov. 6, will be brisk, anticipating a turnout in the city of 60% to 70% — fewer than the gubernatorial recall election and about the same as the last presidential election, he said.

    “The recall election was the highest turnout we’ve had,” Grams said. “I think that’s because it was more of a personal race. People took that one really personally.”

    The presidential election always brings out a lot of people, he said.

    “This one has been as dirty and nasty as it gets,” Grams said. “I’m sure it’s turned some people off, but I don’t think it’ll stop people from voting.”


 
PWHS students to scare up food for the hungry PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 24 October 2012 19:20

Port Washington High School students will join children for trick-or-treat Saturday, but instead of asking for candy, they will be collecting non-perishable food for
the hungry.

    The annual student council-sponsored Trick-or-Treat for the Hungry will run from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27.

    Regular trick-or treat hours are 4 to 7 p.m.

    Homeowners who wish to donate are asked to have food ready to be picked up by the students.

    The annual program benefits the Port Washington Food Pantry.

 
Mural contest to provide artistic view of Port history PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 24 October 2012 19:13

    Artists and designers with an eye for interpreting history are being sought for a mural to be created on the retaining wall on Jackson Street in downtown Port.

    The Heritage Wall Transformation project seeks to bring history to life in an artistic expression, said Sara Grover, executive director of Port Washington Main
Street, which is sponsoring the design competition along with Sign Effectz of Glendale.

    “It’s not just to beautify the downtown, but also to tie in the art we have in Port — the galleries and studios — and to really pick up on the unique history we
have in the city,” Grover said.

    “We want to really capture the lakefront, capture the heritage of Port Washington. Anybody could put a lighthouse on a wall. What they (Main Street’s design
committee) want is to have someone reach back and put up something iconic that relates to the history of Port.”

    The purpose of the wall is to “educate, inspire and express” the city’s history, according to a press release on the competition that notes the mural “will create
something special for the city’s visitors and residents.”

    The competition is not for a paid commission, Grover noted, but for a volunteer willing to work on the mural for the community.

    “We’re looking for someone to give their time and talents,” she said.

    The design committee has wanted to work on the retaining wall for some time, Grover said, but has instead focused on improving the facades of downtown

buildings.

    “That’s happening now,” she said. “Now they’re moving forward on other things that will complement the building facades.”

    The competition is open to individuals or companies, and the designs may be two or three-dimensional.

    Contest entries are due Jan. 1 and will be judged by the Design Committee. One design will be selected for the wall, with the winner announced by March 1.
The mural will then be created on the wall in spring.

    Entry forms are available at Sign Effectz Inc.’s Facebook page or by calling the Main Street office at 268-1132.

 

Daily-Press

 
Town, city of Port gear up for heavy turnout in Nov. 6 election PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 17 October 2012 18:33

With the Nov. 6 election coming close, officials in the town and city of Port Washington are gearing up for the big day.

    Town Clerk Jenny Schlenvogt has scheduled additional office hours beginning next week to handle the expected influx of absentee ballot requests.

    In addition to her regular hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, Schlenvogt will be at Town Hall from 5 to 8 p.m. Thursdays, Oct. 25 and Nov. 1, and from 2 to 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2.vote

    In both communities, absentee ballots are available by mail and may be requested by mail as well. Voters must be registered in the community to obtain these ballots.

    Absentee ballots may be completed in person at municipal offices beginning Monday, Oct. 22, and ending Friday, Nov. 2.

    People may register to vote in person at the community offices until Nov. 2. After that, registration will be at the polls.

    Officials are urging people to register before election day, noting it will help reduce lines at the polls.

    “These last few days, things have picked up considerably,” said Susan Westerbeke, the city’s deputy clerk. “We’ve had a steady stream of absentee ballot applications.”

 
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