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Pedestrians face snowy challenge on new Hwy. 33 sidewalk in city PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 27 February 2013 19:43

    Pedestrians who try to walk on the new sidewalk along Highway 33 on Port Washington’s west side have a difficult journey this winter.

    A segment of the sidewalk just east of Sweetwater Boulevard has gone unshoveled for much of the winter, forcing pedestrians to slog through the snow or walk on the roadway.

    The sidewalk to the east, including some in the Town of Port Washington, has been consistently cleared. The bike path, which crosses from the south side of the road to the north side at Sweetwater, is also cleared.

    City ordinances require sidewalks to be shoveled within 24 hours after a snowfall. If not done, the city will send out a letter notifying the property owner they must shovel, City Administrator Mark Grams said. If the work still isn’t done, the city will clear the walkway and bill the property owner.

    Enforcement is done on a complaint basis, and no one has complained to the city about the Highway 33 sidewalk, Grams said.

    “This is the first I’ve heard of it,” he said, adding he would look into the situation. “We don’t have the sidewalk police out.”

    The sidewalk abuts land owned by We Energies and Bielinski Homes, Grams said.

    When Highway 33 was rebuilt last year,  it was touted as a project that would not only move traffic efficiently but would also provide a safe route for pedestrians and bicyclists to travel between the communities in the form of a sidewalk and bike path.

    While that promise of safe passage for walkers and bikers may be true in spring, summer and fall, winter has provided a true challenge as a debate has continued over who is responsible for shoveling the walkways between the City of Port and Village of Saukville.

    According to an opinion by Town of Port Washington Attorney Steve Cain, based on information from the Department of Transportation, the city and village, not the township, is responsible for clearing the walkways — including those in the town.

    The City of Port Washington is responsible for maintaining them east of Jackson Road, and the Village of Saukville is responsible for the walkways west of Jackson Road, according to the opinion.Daily-Press

    The DOT told Cain that an agreement signed by both municipalities says each shall maintain “sidewalks and landscaping features along the project,” according to the opinion.




 
Town wants residents’ input on Green Bay Rd. PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 27 February 2013 19:35

Port board will hold public informational meeting March 4 on ways to redesign street and make it safer

    For years, residents have told Town of Port Washington officials about the dangers posed on Green Bay Road — the hills and curves, deep ditches and lack of a shoulder they say pose a safety concern, especially since many pedestrians walk along the road as motorists zip past.

    Now, the Town Board is asking residents to tell them what they want to see in a new design for the road, which they plan to rebuild in the future.

    Letters were sent to about 60 homes in the area inviting them to a public informational hearing on the road, which connects highways LL and 33, at 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 4, at Town Hall.

    Former Green Bay Road resident Greg Welton, who lives on nearby Applewood Drive, said that while he generally likes the current road, it would be good to add a separate pedestrian lane or sidewalk.

    “It’s still a country road, one of the oldest around. When the weather’s decent, every day I see people walking there,” he said. “I think more people will walk on it and ride bikes on it if it’s widened or there’s a pedestrian path on one side. It would be nice.”

    Eleanor Kidd has lived at 3014 Green Bay Rd. since 1968 and says the traffic patterns have changed.

    “When I moved here, if you saw a car every hour it was one of your neighbors,” she said. “Nowadays, we’ve got big trucks, heavy equipment, delivery trucks, all sorts of vehicles using the road. We seem to be a shortcut between the north side of Port Washington and Saukville.”

    Traffic moves quickly, Kidd said, and drivers sometimes underestimate the curves and turns of the road.

    She’s also concerned about drainage issues she and her neighbor have, but doesn’t want to see the town upgrade the road to the point of adding too many amenities. “I certainly don’t want us to be city-fied,” she said.

    Ted Fischer, 3065 Green Bay Rd., said that since the speed limit was lowered to 35 mph the number of accidents and problems seems to have diminished.

    The idea of widening the road and adding a bike trail “is just overkill,” he said.

    “All we really need to do is have it resurfaced,” Fischer said. “It’s a historic road. I don’t understand why they’re going to widen it.”

    In the letter to residents, Town Clerk Jennifer Schlenvogt said there are no construction plans or redesign efforts in place for the road, nor plans to repave it in the next two to three years.

    “Your opinion is being sought on future design options,” she wrote. “As you may already know, Green Bay Road is a popular road for pedestrians pushing strollers or walking dogs, bicyclists and as Daily-Pressa convenient route between the north side of Port Washington and Saukville. The safety of all who live on and use this road should be considered if any improvements are to be made to Green Bay Road.”

 
Roggensack, Fallone top county vote in court race PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 20 February 2013 19:27

As they did throughout Wisconsin, incumbent Pat Roggensack and challenger Ed Fallone were the top choices among Ozaukee County voters in Tuesday’s primary election for state Supreme Court justice.

    Roggensack received 7,750 votes, or 82.1% of the total cast in the county, while Fallone picked up 1,430 votes (15.15%). Challenger Vince Megna received 247 votes (2.6%) and was eliminated from the race.Daily-Press

    The county clerk’s office reported that 15% of registered voters went to the polls Tuesday, compared to 84% of voters who took part in the Nov. 6 presidential election.

    The spring general election will be held Tuesday, April 2.

 
Port street projects to be discussed Feb. 26 PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 20 February 2013 19:25

A public informational meeting will be held from 5 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 26, on street projects to be conducted by the City of Port Washington this year.

    The meeting, which will have an open house format, is intended to gather input from residents on the resurfacing projects, address their concerns and answer any questions.

    The projects include resurfacing:

    • Parkway Drive from Norport Drive south to the dead end and from Jacque Lane to Parknoll Lane.

    • Parknoll Lane from Jacque Lane to Seven Hills Road.

    • Parknoll Circle.

    • Westport Drive between Cedar Drive and Portview Drive, as well as the area south of Second Avenue.

    • Cedar Drive from Willow Drive to Westport Drive.

    • Elm, Oak, Sumac, Cedar and Willow courts.Daily-Press
    The meeting will be held in the lower level conference room at City Hall, 100 W. Grand Ave.

    Anyone who can’t attend the meeting may submit comments and concerns to Public Works Director Rob Vanden Noven by calling 268-4267 or e-mailing him at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 
Gourmet popcorn store coming to Port PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 13 February 2013 19:05

Downtown specialty shop set to open by May 1 in newly renovated Brewmeister Building

    A bright red-and-white awning went up at the former Brewmeister building at the foot of St. Mary’s Hill in Port Washington, proclaiming Broadway Popcorn as the newest business on Franklin Street in downtown.

    Owner Bill Bird on Tuesday signed a lease for the first floor of the building, which is being renovated by Ross Leinweber.

    The gourmet popcorn store will open by May 1, Bird said.

    Broadway Popcorn is a gourmet popcorn shop, offering 19 flavors of popcorn ranging from traditional mixes such as caramel and kettle corns to chocolate cherry cheesecake and pickle pop.

    The popcorn is made daily from scratch.

    “We don’t just make caramel corn, we make the caramel itself,” Bird said. “I don’t think you can find better caramel corn. We get a lot of people who come in and tell us, ‘I got a bag and now I’m addicted.’ We hear that time and time again.”

    The shop will also carry some unpopped popcorn — including Fireworks Popcorn, which also has a shop in downtown Port — as well as coconut oil and salt, he said.

    But the bulk of its business is in popped corn, Bird said. Although the vast majority of his business is retail, there is also a wholesale component, he said, noting the shop supplies the American Club and Woodlake Market in Kohler and works with Acuity in Sheboygan.

    This will be the second store for Bird, whose first shop is in Sheboygan Falls — another historic downtown whose revival was prompted by a Main Street effort.

    “I like those of downtown settings,” Bird said. “I don’t want to be in a mall.”

    Bird said he’s run out of room at his Sheboygan Falls shop, especially during the holiday season when he fills numerous corporate orders.

    “We figured the best thing to do would be to open another store,” he said.

    A Mequon native, Bird said he initially looked for a new location in the Cedarburg area.

    “It wasn’t really a fit for us,” he said. “I like our location, and I like Port. It’s a cool little town.”

    With recent improvements in the streetscape and the many building projects ongoing in downtown, Bird said, “I think we got in at the right time. There’s a lot happening here.”

    The city’s tourist trade and marina will provide a good fit for his store, Bird said.

    And Leinweber’s work on the building was another draw, Bird said, noting he has retained the old-fashioned feel of the structure.

    “Ross has done a great job rehabbing the building,” he said.

    The shop will have a retail section facing Franklin Street with production in the rear. The two areas will be open, allowing customers to watch as the staff makes the popcorn, Bird said.

    “You can watch us build a flavor and pop the corn,” he said. “A lot of people are amazed by how we make everything.”

    Therese Suttner will manage both stores for him, Bird said.

    Leinweber is also creating two apartments above the store, which he showed off Tuesday during the Kiss of Indulgence event.

 


 

Image Information: ROSS LEINWEBER, owner of the former Brewmeister building at the corner of Franklin and Jackson streets in downtown Port, announced a retail tenant for the space this week by placing the name of the shop, Broadway Popcorn, on the new awnings.                               Photo by Sam Arendt



 
Town may face $200,000 bill to move bridge PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 13 February 2013 19:11

    It could cost the Town of Port Washington almost $200,000 to remove and replace a small bridge over the Ozaukee Interurban Trail, officials learned last week.

    The concrete on the Highland Road overpass is spalling and small pieces have fallen onto the trail below, prompting Ozaukee County and the town to take action to replace the structure — a large box culvert that serves as a bridge.

    But the cost estimate compiled for Ozaukee County by the engineering firm of Gremmer & Associates surprised officials.

    “This is likely the worst-case scenario,” Town Chairman Jim Melichar said.

    That’s because the estimate includes, among other items, almost $4,000 for curbs and gutters — something not typically installed on town roads, he said.

    The cost of replacing the bridge is considerable for a township whose annual highway expenditure budget is $250,000. Of that, about $140,000 is earmarked for construction.

    “We have to do something about it,” Supr. Mike Didier said, noting the options are to close the bridge, which he said is impractical, replace it or remove it.

    The town, fearful that repairs will be cost prohibitive, has been looking at removing the overpass and creating an at-grade intersection.

    Ozaukee County plans to do work on the bike trail in the area, and it would make sense for the town to do its work at the same time, Melichar said, noting it will minimize the mobilization costs.

    “That would make the most sense,” he said. “I just don’t know where the dollars will come from.”

    The town could potentially remove the bridge and lay a base for its replacement this year, then replace it next year, Melichar said, noting this would spread the cost over two years.

    “We’re going to do something, we just don’t know what,” he said.Daily-Press

    Melichar said he would discuss joint planning for the project with county officials before the Town Board takes action on the matter.

    The town needs to make a decision on the matter in April, when it conducts its annual road tour and considers projects for the year, he said.


 
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