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Who wants to go fly a kite? PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 08 May 2013 17:30

Airborne family fun will highlight Saturday festival in Port’s Upper Lake Park

    Kites will fly above Upper Lake Park in Port Washington Saturday afternoon during a kite festival organized by enthusiast Tom Hudson.

    “It’s a nice way to spend a spring day,” said Hudson. “There’s something about just going out and flying a kite. It’s just fun.”

    The event will run from noon until about 4 p.m., weather permitting. It’ll be a casual event, Hudson said, with people of all ages invited to fly a kite.

    He’ll be flying a few of his own, and will have a few extras on hand available for participants to purchase at cost.

    He’ll probably also have a few kites for a giveaway, Hudson said.

    Hudson said he started flying kites as a child, initially simple paper ones.

    “They were cheap. They’d usually end up in a tree or torn,” Hudson said, adding that one of his favorite childhood memories is of flying kites with his father.

    Years later, he got a little more serious about the hobby and used his sister’s sewing machine to fashion a large box kite.

    That kite survived for many years, although it was damaged after he and his wife Elizabeth O’Connell moved to Port.

    In 2005, he remade the kite, which stands 5 feet tall, Hudson said.

    That same year, he took part in a kite festival organized by former Mayor Scott Huebner.

    While the festival fell to the wayside after a year or two, Hudson’s interest never waned. He said he’s thought about organizing a kite fest for a number of years but didn’t take formal action until recently, “when it finally clicked.”

    That was after he and his wife went bike riding and saw a couple people flying a “cool looking dragon kite.”

    He posted a notice on Facebook and has been encouraged by the response.

    “You need somebody to get this stuff going,” Hudson said. “If we even get a couple kids out there, it’ll be a success as far as I’m concerned.”

    Hudson said he’ll likely have at least five kites flying at the festival — the 5-foot box kite, a 6-foot Japanese rokkaku with six sides, 6-foot and a 16-foot deltas and a 6-foot conyne — and perhaps others as well.

    He said he’ll also have a few classic diamond kites on hand “for the purists who don’t think a kite should be anything but a diamond.”

    Flying kites is a relaxing hobby that’s ideal for a spring day, Hudson said.

    “You can make the hobby as big or as simple as you want,” he said. “You can learn how to make your own kites. You can put a camera on one and take aerial pictures. I’ve got some nice shots looking down on Upper Lake Park.”

    If the festival takes off, Hudson said, he would like to schedule another one for this summer and perhaps follow up again next spring — maybe at Coal Dock Park.

    “Coal Dock Park isn’t ready for it right now,” he said. “But Upper Lake Park is a really pretty place to fly, especially up at the north end.”

    In case of inclement weather, Hudson said, the festival will be rescheduled.


 
Motorcycle crash sends Port teenager to hospital PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 08 May 2013 17:28

A Port Washington teenager was taken to Aurora Medical Center in Grafton following a motorcycle accident on Wisconsin Street in Port Washington Tuesday afternoon.

    The accident occurred when the motorcyclist, Samuel Davel, 18, was trying to turn left from West Beutel Road onto North Wisconsin Street.

    Davel, who was heading east on Beutel Road, started to pull into the intersection when he collided with a minivan driven by Lisa Bradford, 51, of Germantown, according to Lt. Craig Czarnecki.

    Witnesses said Davel’s view was likely obstructed by a bus that was turning right from Wisconsin Street onto Beutel Road, Czarnecki said. Neither Bradford nor her five passengers were injured, Czarnecki said.

    Davel complained of knee and abdominal pain and was taken by ambulance to the hospital to be checked out, Czarnecki said.Daily-Press

    Davel was wearing a helmet, according to police.

    The accident remains under investigation.

 
Vote leaves felon facing election fraud charge PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by BILL SCHANEN IV   
Wednesday, 08 May 2013 17:26

Port woman accused of casting ballot weeks after losing rights in drug case

    Voting is usually considered a civic responsibility, but for a 20-year-old Port Washington woman who cast a ballot in the November 2012 election, it was a crime, according to a criminal complaint filed in Ozaukee County Circuit Court last week.

    Ariana S. Wiedenhoeft, who is charged with one felony count of election fraud-voting by a disqualified person, voted less than a month after pleading guilty to a felony drug charge, the complaint states.

    Felons in Wisconsin cannot vote until they have served their sentences and had their civil rights restored.

    The ballot cast by Wiedenhoeft was discovered by City of Port Washington Deputy Clerk Susan Westerbeke when she compared voting records to a list of ineligible voters compiled by state officials.

    When confronted by police, Wiedenhoeft admitted voting,  something she was warned not to do when she pleaded guilty in the drug case, according to the complaint.

    The transcript of the Oct. 16, 2012, hearing shows that when Wiedenhoeft pleaded guilty to one felony count of possessing narcotic drugs, Judge Paul Malloy informed her she would not be able to vote until her civil rights were restored, the complaint states.

    On Dec. 18, just more than a month after she voted, Wiedenhoeft was sentenced in the drug case. Malloy withheld a prison sentence, placed her on probation for two years and ordered her to serve 60 days in the county jail.

    The judge agreed to expunge the conviction from Wiedenhoeft’s record if she completes probation.

    Wiedenhoeft was initially charged on Jan. 10, 2012, with being part of a mother-daughter drug dealing operation, but a charge of delivery of narcotics was eventually amended to a lesser charge of possessing narcotics.

    According to the criminal complaint, Wiedenhoeft’s mother, Tania Wiedenhoeft, made arrangements to sell oxycodone to an undercover sheriff’s deputy posing as a buyer. Daily-Press
    On Aug. 11, 2011, mother and daughter met the officer in the parking lot of the Target department store in Grafton, where Ariana Wiedenhoeft got into the officer’s car and handed him 40 pills in exchange for $440.

    Tania Wiedenhoeft, 41, pleaded no contest to three felony counts of manufacturing/delivering narcotic drugs and was sentenced by Malloy in July 2012 to one year in jail as a condition of her seven years of probation.

    If Ariana Wiedenhoeft is convicted of voting illegally, she could be sentenced to one year, six months in prison and two years of extended supervision.


   
    
   

 
Driver cited for intentionally running down deer in city PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 01 May 2013 18:13

Deer are a perennial problem for people throughout the area, but one West Bend man took his frustrations too far.

    The 28-year-old man was cited by Port Washington police after he intentionally ran down a deer on South Beach Road early Saturday, according to authorities.

    According to police, the man called to report that he had struck a deer with his Ram pickup truck about 5:25 a.m. and asked to claim the meat.

    While police were on the scene checking out the incident, a call was received from an employee at We Energies who told officers  he saw the man intentionally hit the deer, according to authorities.

    The employee’s story was backed up by a videotape taken by a security camera at the plant that showed the man waiting for three deer to cross the road before he purposely struck a fourth deer, police said.

    Police cited the man for endangering the safety of a person or property by reckless driving. The case was also referred to the Department of Natural Resources, whose conservation warden is continuing the investigation, police said.

    Police also warned a 52-year-old Port Washington man and his young son about trespassing on We Energies’ property to fish on the rocks near the power plant’s intake channel April 27.

    In other police news:

    • Officers asked the district attorney to file charges of burglary and possession of stolen property against a 28-year-old Belgium woman after a break-in was reported at Community Learning Center early April 22.

    Staff at the day-care center reported early April 22 that someone had broken into the facility at 1234 W. Lincoln Ave., taking a backpack and laptop computer, police said.

    There was no sign of forced entry, according to police.

    Officers found a wallet in the woman’s possession, according to police, noting that the wallet was stolen but not from CLC.

    • A rifle was reported stolen from a home on Milwaukee Street about 8:10 p.m. April 21. There were no signs of forced entry, according to police.

    • Officers are seeking charges of possession of marijuana against a 23-year-old Milwaukee man and a 22-year-old Appleton woman following a traffic stop early April 27.

    According to police, they stopped the car after it was seen weaving from side to side, then cited the man for drunken driving and driving while his license was suspended.

    Police said they are also seeking charges of possession of a controlled substance against the woman.badge
    • Police warned two people — a 22-year-old Port Washington woman and a 27-year-old California man — who were on South Beach about 1 a.m. April 27, well after the park had closed.

    • Six teenagers from Port Washington and Saukville were warned for being in Columbia Park after hours about 10:40 p.m. April 26.

    • A 15-year-old girl was cited for a curfew violation April 27 after her mother reported the teenager had not returned to her Port  Washington home about midnight April 27. The girl returned home shortly after police were called.


 
Port waste yard now open to city residents PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 01 May 2013 18:00

The Port Washington city yard on Moore Road is open for residents to drop off yard waste.

    The yard is open from 3 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.

    Grass, garden waste and other materials should never be raked into the street or curb. Those are among the materials that will be accepted at the yard.

    Leaves may be raked into the gutter, but only in the fall.

 
Opening a new door to Port’s past PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 24 April 2013 18:24

Historical Society will display items that reflect city’s proud heritage during unveiling of center Saturday

    The Port Washington Historical Society has pulled out some quintessential items from the city’s past to exhibit when it opens the doors of its research center to the public Saturday, April 27.

    Four exhibits — on Smith Bros., Paramount Records, the Port Washington City Band and the Wisconsin Chair Co. — will be featured at the open house, which will run from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    Among the items on display will be uniforms, sheet music and instruments from the City Band; chairs, a tabletop mirror and footstool made by the Chair Co.; floor and tabletop record players and records from Paramount Records and signs, a fish box, net and models of the fishing tugs once operated by Smith Bros.

    “It’s so nice to be able to have those out where people can see them,” Society President Jackie Oleson said, noting that in the organization’s previous homes, there wasn’t room to display artifacts.


    The grand opening marks a new chapter for the Society.


    It was just a year ago that the research center was a dream for the Society. It had made an offer to purchase the building last January, but the group didn’t close on the purchase until August.


    It took about two months to complete demolition work in the structure, and since then members and contractors have worked steadily to renovate the building at 205 N. Franklin St.


    “It’s basically a new building inside,” Oleson said, noting it has a new roof and mechanical systems, as  well as woodwork and cabinetry.


    The tin ceiling and original floors, however, have been refurbished and gleam.


    In January, the Society moved its records and artifacts into the center and began organizing things.


     “It’s been a crazy year, but we are finally settled in,” Oleson said. “We want to share our new digs so people get a chance to see what we have here and to appreciate an 1852 building that’s gotten new life.”


    The open house is one of the few chances people will have to see the entire building, she added, noting the second floor will generally be off limits to the public.


    The second floor holds a board room and archival area, where work will be done to catalog the Society’s collections and preserve items.


    One major project for the Society will be cataloging the extensive Paul Wiening collection of photographs and slides, Oleson said.


    The first floor of the building has exhibit space near the street, with a research area toward the middle. A raised area in the back holds offices.


    The society’s exhibits will likely change twice a year, Oleson said, although there will be one permanent exhibit. A corner of the first floor is dedicated to Barnum Blake and his family.


    Blake, who was a mover and shaker in the city, constructed the building that houses the research center — it’s one of two remaining buildings he constructed, Oleson said.


    The exhibit includes some Victorian furnishings, restored oil paintings of Blake and his daughter Louisa Blake Bostwick and a framed Civil War photo of Blake’s son Edward.


    Although the Society has completed much of its work on the building, some renovations to the exterior are still planned. These renovations — moving the door to the center of the front and adding a transom window above it, framing the windows in wood, raising the canopy, refurbishing the awning and adding a sign — were approved by the city’s Plan Commission last week.


    The Society hopes to raise $50,000 for this work, Oleson said, adding members would like to complete this project by the end of the year.


    The research center is one of two buildings the group is renovating in downtown. The other, the historic Businessman’s Club at 118 N. Franklin St., will be converted into a museum.


    That work probably won’t be done until 2014, Oleson said.


    “That building has its own historic features we want to preserve and respect and work with,” she said. “It’s a building with a lot of potential.”


    Oleson said the Society hopes its work will inspire other property owners to not only consider restoring their buildings to their historic roots but to also look at new uses for them.


    “Really, when you get down to it, this was taking an old building and finding another use for it,” she said. “We hope this will encourage others to take a look at their buildings, too.


    “We’ve got so many buildings in downtown that date back to the 1800s. But unless you look at the top of some of them, you wouldn’t know that.”


    The grand opening is the first formal event at the research center, but it’s certainly not the only time the building will be open.


    The center will be open from 1 to 4 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays, and the Society is seeking volunteers to help staff the facility as it looks to add hours on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays.


Image Information: PREPARING FOR an open house at their new Research Center on Friday, (from left) Port Washington Historical Society President Jackie Oleson and members Pat Moren, Geri Zehren and Sarah Smith checked out instruments and other items in an exhibit on the City Band.      Photo by Sam Arendt

 
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