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Rebound year means profit for marina PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Kristyn Halbig Ziehm   
Wednesday, 14 September 2016 19:12

After losing money in 2014 and 2015, operations are back in black thanks to good fishing, cooperative weather

After two years of losing money, the Port Washington marina will see a profit this year, the Harbor Commission learned Monday. Good fishing and pleasant weather combined to help the marina realize a profit this year, Harbormaster Dennis Cherny said.

Not including revenue from Labor Day weekend, Cherny said, the marina has exceeded its budget and brought in more money than it did last year at this time.

The marina has generated in $618,441 in slip rentals, season and daily launch fees and transient fees, compared to $571,410 last year.

“It’s amazing what weather can do,” City Administrator Mark Grams said.

Cherny told the commission that the marina is 96% full, and a waiting list has formed for next season.

“There aren’t too many marinas this side of the lake doing that,” he said. “We get inquiries every day.”

This year, Cherny said, there have been 3,500 daily launches compared to 2,000 last year.

The highest year ever at the marina was 4,500 launches, he said. If boating continues the way it has, he estimated this year’s number could climb to 4,000.

This year, the marina sold 223 seasonal launch passes, he said, compared to 209 last year. Typically, the marina sells between 250 and 300.

Many boaters purchased daily passes instead of seasonal ones, fearing they wouldn’t use them often enough to justify the purchase, Assistant Harbormaster Lisa Rathke said.

Transient boat fees have totalled $48,550 so far this year, Cherny said, compared to $35,000 last year.

“We’ll hit $50,000 easily,” he said.

In the north slip, Cherny said, transient fees this year total $17,000 compared to $12,000 last year.

“That sounds really good,” Commission Chairman Gerald Gruen Jr. said.

But noting that the marina lost money over the last two years, when the weather was cooler and the fishing poorer, commission members agreed to raise the slip rates for next year. They didn’t set an exact amount, but instead said they want to see where the budget leads.

It’s been at least five years since the rates were raised, Cherny said, suggesting the increase be only .5% to 1%.

“I don’t think we have a choice,” Ald. Bill Driscoll, a member of the commission, said. “We’ve lost money the last two years.

“While we’ve got a waiting list and people are excited about fishing and boating, we have to do it.”

Gruen said he would not favor any large increase, but said a small one would be justified, especially since the boating economy has picked up in the last year or so.

Imposing a small increase now will be more palatable than a larger one in the future, commission member Dan Herlache added.

 The city’s rates are lower than any nearby marinas, members noted.Daily Press

 
United Way to get campaign cooking with soup PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Kristyn Halbig Ziehm   
Wednesday, 07 September 2016 18:11

Northern Ozaukee agency asks residents to contribute food items for Sept. 24 event that benefits Family Sharing

United Way of Northern Ozaukee will open this year’s campaign not with its traditional Day of Caring but with a Stone Soup event.

The Stone Soup event will be held on Saturday, Sept. 24, with participants gathering to package 100 quarts of vegetable soup for the food pantry at Family Sharing in Grafton.

After the soup is packaged, participants will partake in a soup luncheon.

Community members are being asked to contribute ingredients for the soup — everything from chopped onions to zucchini — as well as nonperishable food items such as rice, pasta and Parmesan cheese, said Barbara Bates-Nelson, executive director of the local United Way.

The event will play off the stone soup story in which a stranger enters a village and, after being told there is no food to eat, sets a pot of water on a fire. He puts a stone in the pot and tells the villagers he’s making stone soup. One by one, the villagers each bring an ingredient to add, and the stranger ends up with a pot of soup for the entire community to enjoy.

“United Way was founded on the same idea, that each of us can give, advocate and volunteer to improve our community,” Bates-Nelson said. “I think this will be a meaningful way to kick off the campaign.

“We wanted to do something different this year that would bring awareness to our community, and I think this will do that.”

The Stone Soup event will actually begin before Sept. 24. Bates-Nelson is asking people to sign up to bring various vegetables to her by Wednesday, Sept. 21.

Her list of ingredients is large — 16 cups each of onions, tomatoes, green beans, carrots, potatoes, corn, celery, squash and zucchini, as well as 8 cups of cabbage, spinach and chard.

People aren’t being asked to bring in the entire amount, Bates-Nelson said, but only between two cups and four quarts.

She will drop the vegetables off at Twisted Willow restaurant, which will use them to make the soup.

On Saturday, Sept. 24, the soup will be dropped off at First Congregational Church, where volunteers will package it for the Family Sharing food pantry.

“My goal is to get 100 people to package the soup,” Bates-Nelson said. “And when we’re all done, we’re going to sit down and break some bread, have some soup and dessert. By noon, we’ll be cleaning up and people will have the rest of the day to themselves.”

She’s hoping to recruit someone to read the Stone Soup story during the meal.

Craft Books and Brews in downtown Port has provided some Stone Soup books to be sold during the event, Bates-Nelson said. 

This is the perfect time of year for such an event, according to Bates-Nelson.

“We have so many plentiful gardens around here, and a lot of us are getting tired of our garden by the end of September,” she said. “This is using healthy, fresh ingredients and building a soup to help provide healthy meals to those in need. When people come into the food pantry, they’ll get a quart of soup, some bread and dessert.

“If we can help and provide a hearty meal, I think that’s a great thing.”

Bates-Nelson said she is also looking to collect nonperishable items — rice, pasta, canned tomatoes, kidney beans, chickpeas, crackers and Parmesan cheese — that can be added to the soup if needed or donated to the food pantry for distribution.

These items can be dropped off with her or at the Port Washington beer garden, which will be operated by United Way of Northern Ozaukee on Saturday, Sept. 10.

“I’m excited about this,” Bates-Nelson said. “This is our first year, and I’d like to see this grow in the years to come.”

For more information or to sign up for an ingredient, email Bates-Nelson at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .Daily Press

 
County 4-H clubs to hold recruiting fairs in September PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 07 September 2016 18:10

Ozaukee County’s 4-H clubs will host two recruiting fairs in September.

The first will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13, in the Divine Savior Catholic Church basement and the second from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14, at the Ozaukee County Pavilion at the fairgrounds in Cedarburg. 

The events will feature hands-on activities, demonstrations, project and club information and prizes. 

The fair is aimed at youngsters of all ages. Children in first and second grades can be part of the Cloverbud program, and those in third grade and older are part of the regular 4-H clubs.

For more information, contact Diane Hamm at 689-2589, Marie Paulus at 692-9427 or the Ozaukee County 4-H Extension office at 284-8288 or visit www.co.ozaukee.wi.us/4h.Daily Press

 
Fallen conduit forces lane closures on I-43 PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 07 September 2016 18:09

An electrical conduit that fell from underneath the Highway 32 overpass closed all four lanes of I-43 in the Town of Grafton Tuesday evening, according to the Ozaukee County Sheriff’s Department.

The conduit fell at about 5:30 p.m., blocking north and southbound traffic for an hour and a half.

One vehicle suffered a flat tire after driving over the conduit, Lt. Wayne Lambrecht said. 

Although the incident occurred during rush hour, the traffic backups were not as serious as they could have been because vehicles were able to exit I-43 at Highway 32, then immediately re-enter the freeway, Lambrecht said.Daily Press

 
County sells ramp land to company for housing project PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Mitch Maersch   
Wednesday, 07 September 2016 18:06

The Ozaukee County Board on Wednesday approved an offer from Cardinal Capital Management to buy a portion of the former ramp land at highways 33 and LL in Port Washington.

The West Allis company plans to construct housing for adults with autism on a 6.1-acre plot, company president Erich Schwenker told the board.

Cardinal Capital Management will pay $406,500 for the northern portion of the parcel. The remainder of the 12-acre parcel will be relisted for sale by the county.

Cardinal Capital Management plans to construct a 66-unit apartment building with 10 to 20 units intended for people with autism.

The rest of the units would be leased at market rates to Concordia University Wisconsin students.

Included in the proposed project is a 10,000-square-foot building for the Milwaukee Center for Independence to provide services for autistic residents and the community.

The project also includes habitat and woods restoration, Schwenker said.

Since the land is in the City of Port Washington, the Common Council has to approve the use of the land. The County Board only approved the sale.

Schwenker said preliminary discussions with the city about the concept of the project have been positive.

The boundaries of the parcel to be purchased will be defined through a land division approved by the City of Port Washington and the county.

The County Public Works Committee earlier Wednesday added a clause that 25% of the proceeds from the sale must be put toward the Highland Road interchange project.

Several years ago, the county committed to pay for a portion of the interchange, earmarking a portion of any land sale to the project.

The land sale passed on a 24-0 vote.

The nearly 12-acre parcel was created when the intersection of the two highways was converted to a roundabout several years ago.

The county declared the land excess right-of-way and put it up for sale about two years ago.Daily Press

 
Music fest to make its Port debut on lakefront PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Kristyn Halbig Ziehm   
Wednesday, 31 August 2016 19:11

After 10 years in Grafton, the Paramount Blues Festival will be held this weekend in a new location and with a new name.

The Paramount Music Festival will be staged in Port Washington’s Coal Dock Park Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 2 through 4.

“We’re very excited,” organizer Kris Raymond said. “Lime Kiln Park (in Grafton) was a great place to be, but we basically outgrew it.”

The new location on Port Washington’s lakefront offers those attending the festival a host of other activities to enjoy, she said.

Those include a sailboat regatta Saturday and a Venetian Night parade of decorated boats through the harbor, sponsored by the Port Washington Yacht Club, at about 8 p.m. Sunday.

“I think it will be so fun to have sailboats in the viewing area,” Raymond said. “While you’re looking at the stage, you’ll be looking at Lake Michigan. You can see the lighthouse. When you turn around to get food, you’ll be looking at the harbor.

“It’s so beautiful, and there’s just a lot of things for people to do. People can walk to downtown, shop and have lunch or dinner. You won’t be bored at this festival.” 

So far, Raymond said, the change in venue has been greeted warmly by those who have traditionally attended. There’s been an increase in ticket presales, with online sales up 30%, she said.

The new name, the Paramount Music Festival, reflects the fact that the blues have influenced all genre of music and many of those will be represented at the fest.

“Some people say they don’t like the blues, but they don’t know what it is,” Raymond said, “It’s part of every type of music we listen to.”

Blues is the focus, and headlining the festival at 8 p.m. Saturday will be Mud Morganfield, the eldest son of legendary bluesman Muddy Waters.

Morganfield, who was brought up surrounded by many of the finest blues musicians of their time, learned from the best. His father gave him a set of drums for Christmas each year, but the bass guitar later became his instrument of choice.

He has become an accomplished musician, with original works rooted in traditional Chicago blues but updated to reflect today’s music. 

Morganfield has had a number of acclaimed albums, including his most recent work, “Son of the Seventh Son,” and has won numerous awards, including the 2015 Blues Blast Award for traditional blues album for “For Pops,” a tribute to his father. 

Headlining the festival at 8:30 p.m. Friday will be Tommy Castro and The Painkillers.

Castro, who started playing guitar at age 10, released his first of 14 albums in 1996. His original songs reflect blues, soul and West Coast rock, and have won numerous honors. 

In his four decades long career, Castro has won six Blues Music Awards, including the B.B. King Entertainer of the Year Award.

On Friday, when the gate opens at 4:30 p.m., the festival begins with a performance by Shonn Hinton & Shotgun at 5 p.m., followed by The Jimmys at 6:30 p.m.

Saturday’s performances begin at noon with Steve Cohen, followed by Lil Davy Max at 1 p.m., The Blues Disciples at 2:30 p.m., Davina & The Vagabonds at 4 p.m. and Rev. Raven & The Chain Smokin’ Altar Boys with Westside Andy at 6 p.m.

Joe Filisko and Glen Kaizer will begin Sunday’s performances at 12:30 p.m., followed by Studebaker John and the Hawks at 2 p.m., Tim Castle’s Country Legends Tribute at 4 p.m., Billy Bon Scott’s AC/DC tribute at 5:45 p.m. and Whiskey of the Damned at 7:30 p.m.

A classic car club display will be part of the event on Sunday.

The gate opens at 11:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday.

The festival features open-air lawn seating, so festival-goers are encouraged to bring their own blankets and chairs.

There will be a limited number of chairs available for rent.

If the weather is warm, a couple of shade tents will be set up.

Daily admission  Friday and Saturday is $20. There is no admission fee Sunday. 

Free shuttle service to the festival will be offered from Comfort Inn and Hampton Inn & Suites, both in Grafton, Motel 6 and Walmart, both in Saukville, Country Inn & Suites in Port Washington and the Port Washington outdoor pool. 

Major sponsors for the festival are Ozaukee Press, Port Washington Tourism Council and Blues After Hours Radio.Daily Press

 
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