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Gasser to autograph book at The Patio PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 29 July 2015 20:24

Gasser badgerPort Washington High School graduate and former University of Wisconsin-Madison basketball star Josh Gasser will sign copies of the book “Make ’Em Believe” at the Patio Bar & Grill from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 6.

A four-year starter for coach Bo Ryan, Gasser played a key role in the Badgers’ run to the national championship this season and Final Four appearance last year.


The book, written by Patrick Herb, UW assistant director of communications, features a foreword by Naismith Award winner Frank Kaminsky.


The book tells first-hand stories from Wisconsin players and Ryan.


Books are available for $25 or two for $40.


The Patio is at 601 N. Wisconsin St., Port Washington.

 
Bachfest to feature Port High grad, offer classical spin on concert scene PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 29 July 2015 20:21

Classical music by Johann Sebastian Bach will be heard on the Port Washington lakefront at 1 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 2, as St. John’s Lutheran Church presents Bachfest 2015.

    The free concert at the gazebo in Rotary Park will feature a program of Bach’s sacred repertoire.

    Justin Spenner, a 2006 graduate of Port Washington High School, will be the featured vocalist.

    Spenner, who sings baritone and bass, earned a bachelor’s degree in vocal performance from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and a master’s of music degree in vocal performance from the University of Minnesota. 

    Spenner, who has had lead roles in more than a dozen operas and whose specialty is solo work, is based in the Twin Cities performing this summer in the Mill City Summer Opera production of “La Fille du Regiment” by Donizetti. 

    The day after his appearance in Port Washington, Spenner is flying to Paris for engagements in Europe.

    “I looked all over the Midwest for a bass to sing these Bach arias,” said Christian Martin, the festival’s music director. “Finding a bass/baritone who is willing and able to sing these songs is not easy.  They are difficult, rarely performed, and then by only the most deep pocketed organizations. ”

    Supporting Spenner will be musicians from local and North Shore churches. 

    The theme of the concert is “Music from the Passions,” but there will also be some lighter Bach works — including an opportunity for the audience to participate on kazoo during “Jesu Joy of Man’s Desiring.”

    Although some seating will be available, listeners are encouraged to bring their own blankets or chairs. 

    Food and beverages will be sold. 

    In case of rain, the concert will be held at St. John’s Church, 217 N. Freeman Dr. 

    For more information, call the church at 284-2131 or  visit www.stjohns-port-com.

 

 
Fredonia EMT hurt when vehicle rolls over PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 22 July 2015 20:29

Brianna Large, an emergency medical technician with the Fredonia Fire Department, suffered serious injuries when her Dodge Durango rolled three times late Saturday night, July 18, while she was rushing to a rescue call.

Large, 23, of Port Washington, was driving to the Fredonia fire station after receiving a page about a medical emergency at Lakeside Foods in Belgium.

She reportedly lost control of her vehicle on a curve on Highway KW, over-corrected her steering and rolled. Large was reportedly thrown through the back window of the SUV in the accident.

According to reports, Large sustained a broken arm and rib, several fractures to her face, a fractured sternum and a damaged disk in her back.

Emergency responders were going to call the Flight for Life to transport her to medical attention, but the helicopter was not available.
Daily Press
Large was transported to Aurora Medical Center in Grafton, and then transferred to Froedtert in Milwaukee.

As of early this week, she was in the hospital’s intensive care unit.

Large is a 2010 graduate of Port Washington High School. She grew up on the Town of Port Washington farm of her parents, Gary and Terry Large, on Highway KW.

 
Woman accused of plotting to have judge beaten PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by BILL SCHANEN IV   
Wednesday, 22 July 2015 20:27

Complaint says she asked undercover agent posing as thug to hurt Malloy, her ex-husband and his girlfriend

    A 47-year-old woman apparently angry about her divorce case has been charged with attempting to hire a thug to rough up an Ozaukee County judge, her ex-husband and his girlfriend.

    Eleonora K. Klurfeld Milshteyn of Mequon was charged last week with solicitation of battery or threat to a judge and two counts of solicitation of aggravated battery, all felonies.

    Judge Joseph Voiland set her bail at $100,000.

    According to the criminal complaint, Judge Paul Malloy held Klurfeld Milshteyn in contempt of court during her divorce proceedings and sentenced her to 60 days in jail beginning May 12.

    Once in jail, she approached another inmate who told authorities Klurfeld Milshteyn talked to her several times about finding someone to kill Malloy, saying she would pay the person $50,000, the complaint states. The inmate said Klurfeld Milshteyn pretended to be crazy in the hope she would be released from jail but is actually very smart.

    The inmate said she was so concerned about the judge’s safety that she wrote him a letter warning him about Klurfeld Milshteyn’s plan.

    Another inmate told authorities that Klurfeld Milshteyn told her she wanted the judge and her ex-husband “taken out” and needed someone to “take care of the dirty work,” according to the complaint.

    On July 2, investigators recorded a conversation between the second inmate and Klurfeld Milshteyn in which Klurfeld Milshteyn agreed to pay a hit man $6,000 to deal with the judge and $3,000 each for her ex-husband and his girlfriend, the complaint states.

    Shortly after Klurfeld Milshteyn was released from jail on July 10, the second inmate, working with authorities, set up a meeting between Klurfeld Milshteyn and a special agent with the Wisconsin Department of Justice posing as a hit man.

    Klurfeld Milshteyn arrived at a grocery store parking lot in Mequon driving a 2014 Range Rover and told the agent she wanted Malloy beaten, according to the complaint.

    She also said she wanted her ex-husband and his girlfriend beaten until he was rendered impotent and she could not bear children, the complaint states. Daily Press

    Klurfeld Milshteyn told the agent her husband is a physician who practices at a Milwaukee hospital and his girlfriend lives in New Berlin, according to authorities.

    Although Voiland ordered Klurfeld Milshteyn held in jail in lieu of $100,000 bail, he said she could seek inpatient treatment but not leave the facility without permission of the court.

    Voiland then recused himself from the case, which has been assigned to Waukesha County Circuit Judge Kathryn Foster.

    Each of the crimes Klurfeld Milshteyn is charged with is punishable by a maximum three years in prison and three years of extended supervision.



 
City may add September visit by tall ship PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 15 July 2015 19:49

Bouyed by success of Denis Sullivan’s first two stops, Port mayor will ask council to authorize another visit

    The Port Washington Common Council’s decision to bring the Denis Sullivan to the city this summer is paying off, Mayor Tom Mlada said Tuesday.

    The ship is attracting tourists to the city, providing residents with a lakefront attraction and spurring business downtown, Mlada said.DENIS SULLIVAN

    The tall ship’s first two visits have been so successful — and tickets for cruises during the next visit in August are moving quickly — that Mlada said he will ask the Common Council on July 21 to authorize a September stop by the vessel.

    “Everybody seems to be excited about it,” Mlada said of the tall ship’s visit to the city. “People are just really having a good experience on the ship.”

    Mlada got a first-hand look at the excitement when he and his father sailed on the ship for the fireworks cruise on the Fourth of July.

    The three cruises that weekend sold out by Thursday, Mlada noted, and approximately 175 people took deck tours of the boat on Independence Day.

    “It was a really festive atmosphere,” he said. “You had the Port Washington fireworks going on, and then you saw two other fireworks — I think it might have been Whitefish Bay’s and Sheboygan’s — going off at the same time. It was just so cool to see.”

    Among the many people on board the boat were a couple from Minnesota who Mlada said told him they had been meaning to come to Port Washington and, after hearing the Sullivan would be in Port, decided this was the time to come.

    “I thought, ‘This is exactly why we’re doing this,’” Mlada said, noting the couple rattled off an extensive list of businesses they had frequented while in the city.

    Businesses in the city have also reported increased traffic and sales on weekends when the boat has been in the harbor, Mlada said.

    He noted that sales for cruises during the ship’s Aug. 21 to 23 visit are selling well, even though the city hasn’t done much marketing of them.

    Mlada said he will be meeting with a core group of organizers for the ship’s visits to find dates for a September stop. Right now, he said, they are considering a Sept. 4 to 9 visit, with several day trips dedicated to school classes.

    Mlada said he will talk to administrators from not only the Port Washington-Saukville School District but also private schools in the area to determine interest in those cruises.

    He also noted that fundraising done before the ship arrived paid for much of the cost of the visits, and much of the revenue from the deck tours and cruises will be used to bring the Sullivan back to Port next year.

     The organizing group will be looking at potential dates for the Sullivan to come to Port next year, Mlada said.



 
Bill for repair of courthouse tower increases by $300,000 PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by MICHAEL LoCICERO   
Wednesday, 15 July 2015 19:46

Safety concerns prompt county supervisors to tap into reserve fund for change order

Repairs to the historic Ozaukee County Courthouse in Port Washington will cost $300,000 more than expected after considerable damage to the clock tower was discovered last month.

A June 30 report from consultant Preserve Design Studio notes a considerable number of “cracks and voids” on the tower. Further inspection showed mortar failure and other deteriorating conditions.

County officials aren’t sure what is causing the damage, but believe the “connection of the HVAC system, exposure to the elements and known lightning strikes” may have contributed to the deterioration.

“This wasn’t apparent from the ground,” County Administrator Tom Meaux said. “It turns out there are a lot of problem areas, and we’re trying to address it in a timely manner with the scaffolding in place.”

A separate $350,000 project to clean, repair and replace the courthouse’s masonry started in April, but the $300,000 change order, which was approved by the County Board on Wednesday, is “a tough pill to swallow,” Meaux said.

The money will come out of the county’s capital reserve fund, which had about $1 million at the beginning of the year, he said. Various projects have pared that to between $500,000 and $600,000.

“We set money aside for things like this,” Meaux said. “We have other reserves as well, and I feel good about how we manage our money here.”

County Board Chairman Lee Schlenvogt said it is important to consider safety despite the high cost of the repairs.

“I understand we don’t want to spend money needlessly,” he said. “Now that we’re aware of this, if something happened, there’s a liability factor.”

Donna Weiss of Preserve Design Studio told the County Board Wednesday that there isn’t an immediate danger of falling masonry, but that could occur in the future if repairs aren’t made.

“We’re not seeing displaced stones that look like they could fall,” she said.

Meaux classified the damage as an unexpected emergency that has to be fixed as soon as possible.

“We have a team ready to take this project on,” he said before the vote. Marion, Inc., the firm that was awarded the bid for the original repairs, will continue with the work.

The additional work will not only fix the current problems, it will prevent further deterioration in the future, officials said.

The work includes installing lightning protection, flexible mortar joints and anchors to allow consultants to rappel the tower for inspection and routine maintenance in the future.

A structural engineer will also be hired to determine if vibrations from the HVAC unit are contributing to the damage.

If that is the case, the county could be on the hook for more money if it’s determined the HVAC connection has to be moved.

Marion will also rebuild all four tower piers, repair stone fractures and install joints to allow for tower movement. The two-month project will cost approximately $219,000, company officials said in a report to the county.

“It’s expensive, but we don’t really have a choice,” Meaux said. “This needs to be done now.”

Supr. Tom Winker said he agrees with Weiss’ evaluation but asked the board to consider lowering or removing the four tower piers instead of rebuilding them.

“There’s no guarantee we won’t be back here in a few years doing the same thing,” he said. “Is it best to reduce or lower the piers to the roof line?”

Weiss and Marion Construction President Mario Machnicki said that wouldn’t save much money and would put the tower at risk in the future.

The fund transfer was approved, 19-1, with Winker voting against it.



 
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