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Council aims to hone its communication skills PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 26 April 2017 21:04

Port officials to dedicate meeting time to discussing key issues so residents don’t feel left in the dark

For the next year, the Port Washington Common Council will devote a portion of each meeting to discussing the pressing issues facing the community, Mayor Tom Mlada announced last week.

The initiative will look at the community’s needs and the attendant expenses involved in each, he said, explaining this is an effort to give people the background needed as they look at various projects the city is considering.

He framed the topics as “challenges and opportunities” the city is facing and dealing with.

“This is an introduction to the topics,” Mlada said. “It’s meant to be a starting point. It’s a way to invite people into the conversation so they understand the situations we’re facing and the interconnectedness of them all.”

Development issues have split the city in the past year, and Mlada said the sessions will give people the background they need to fully assess these proposals. 

Ald. Doug Biggs said the council  “heard loud and clear” people’s concerns that they want more information about what is happening in the city, and the initiative will address that.

Decisions aren’t likely to be made on the nights when each topic is addressed, he said.

“We believe it’s important to get all that information to the community to make sure we’re all singing out of the same song book,” Biggs said.

Underscoring the effort are several core principles, Mlada said — increasing residential density, attracting strategic retailers and adding attractions that will enhance downtown and draw people there year-round, and preserving and enhancing safe public lakefront access.

“We must drive economic growth within our community to be successful long-term,” he said. 

Mlada noted that the earliest topics involve costs and needs the city needs to address soon, while those later in the year will deal with funding.

“These are conversations we have to have,” Mlada said. 

While people may disagree on the solutions to many of the issues, he added, “they need to understand what we’re facing.”

The topics to be addressed are:

nBreakwater repairs on May 2.

nThe lighthouse preservation efforts on May 16. The city has not yet received ownership of the lighthouse from the federal government, Mlada said, but that is expected to occur soon.

nStreet and sidewalk projects and the pavement and surface evaluation and rating system used to determine their priorities on May 6.

nPolice and fire department needs on June 20.

nIn July, when the council holds only one meeting, capital needs across all city departments will be examined.

“There are capital needs that are going unfulfilled,” Mlada said, adding that the challenge for the city is that “the more we push things down the line, the more expensive they become.”

nMarketing and economic development will be addressed Aug. 1.

nA review of city revenues is slated for Aug. 15.

nA borrowing update will be given on Sept. 5.

nThe city’s tax incremental financing district will be examined on Sept. 19.

nGrowth strategies for the city’s manufacturing and commercial base will be discussed Oct. 13.

nThe city’s economic development plan for 2035 will be reviewed on Oct. 17.

nBudget realities are the subject for the Nov. 7 meeting.

nDowntown redevelopment is slated for the Nov. 21 meeting.

nA year-end review will be held on Dec. 5.

 
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