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Port Washington
City poised to hire firm for senior center study PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 18 February 2015 18:46

Port council wants needs assessment to help determine fate of facility that some officials want closed

Port Washington aldermen were expected on Wednesday to hire a company to conduct a needs assessment that will help determine the fate of the senior center.

Two companies have submitted proposals to conduct the study, which is expected to cost $13,000.

The need for the study became apparent when officials said the city will no longer provide a senior center facility when the lease to the current building expires in two years, but it will continue to offer services for older adults.

Even as the city takes the initial steps to eliminate the senior center, some seniors are letting officials know how important the facility is to them.

“I just want to express my happiness at having a senior center,” Bev Schleg, 1102 N. Stanford St., told the Common Council Feb. 3. “I like the trips. I go to exercise class there. I’m a member of the Chicks with Sticks.

“All the friends I have made there — I would be lost without my senior center.”

 The needs assessment, which is expected to gather information on what services seniors want from the city, is expected to poll people of all ages.

The Commission on Aging has recommended the city hire MSA Professional Services to conduct the assessment, which will include everything from the results of a senior services survey to a listing of senior services offered by other groups in the area.

 A summary of potential courses of action for the city will also be offered, along with the advantages, disadvantages and general feasibility of each.

 MSA estimated it will complete its report in July.

The Common Council agreed earlier this year to spend as much as $6,000 on the assessment, supplementing a $3,000 contribution from the Senior Center, $4,500 from the Friends of the Senior Center and $500 from the Green Felt Club.

The needs assessment will help officials determine what senior services are needed in the future as they grapple with the question of what the senior center will look like in the years to come.

 Officials have said a number of seniors are dissatisfied with the current center building on Foster Street, saying the parking is inconvenient and there are too many steps in the building.

The Commission on Aging last year created an ad hoc committee to look at the center’s needs and plan for the future knowing that the current center isn’t necessarily a long-term home for the facility.

“We need to gather evidence to help guide our decision,” Senior Center Director Catherine Kiener said earlier this year, noting the center is a quality-of-life issue for residents. “Hopefully this will draw everything together, the past and present and bring us into the future.”

 
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